The genus Penicillium is among the most common contaminant fungi in the environment. Around 15 species are known to cause opportunistic human mycoses, in immunocompromised patients. Until now, Penicillium purpurogenum has been involved in only three human cases of pulmonary diseases but no infections in animals have been reported. Most disseminated mycoses in dogs are caused by members of the genus Aspergillus, with the predisposing factors in these cases being difficult to define. The case reported here involved a 4-year-old female German shepherd dog (GSD) with forelimb instability and back pain. Clinical examination showed hyperthermia, generalized lymphadenomegaly and kyphosis. Radiological findings of the spine revealed areas of discospondilitis involving thoracic and lumbar vertebrae. Microscopic observations of fine needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) of lymph-nodes showed regular, septate, branching fungal hyphae. Itraconazole therapy was started but the subject died six days later. Disseminated necrotic areas were detected in enlarged lymph-nodes, liver and spleen. Vertebral granulomas within lytic areas in T10-T11 and L2-L3, were observed. Cultures inoculated with samples obtained from lymph-node FNAB and bioptic material from necropsied organs revealed the presence of pure cultures of Penicillium, subsequently identified as P. purpurogenum. Apart from female GSD's suspected predisposition to disseminated mycoses described in literature, no other predisposing factors were ascertained in this case.

A case of disseminated mycosis in a German shepherd dog due to Penicillium purpurogenum

ZANATTA, Renato;MINISCALCO, Barbara;CAPUCCHIO, Maria Teresa;GALLO, Maria Grazia;PEANO, Andrea
2006

Abstract

The genus Penicillium is among the most common contaminant fungi in the environment. Around 15 species are known to cause opportunistic human mycoses, in immunocompromised patients. Until now, Penicillium purpurogenum has been involved in only three human cases of pulmonary diseases but no infections in animals have been reported. Most disseminated mycoses in dogs are caused by members of the genus Aspergillus, with the predisposing factors in these cases being difficult to define. The case reported here involved a 4-year-old female German shepherd dog (GSD) with forelimb instability and back pain. Clinical examination showed hyperthermia, generalized lymphadenomegaly and kyphosis. Radiological findings of the spine revealed areas of discospondilitis involving thoracic and lumbar vertebrae. Microscopic observations of fine needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) of lymph-nodes showed regular, septate, branching fungal hyphae. Itraconazole therapy was started but the subject died six days later. Disseminated necrotic areas were detected in enlarged lymph-nodes, liver and spleen. Vertebral granulomas within lytic areas in T10-T11 and L2-L3, were observed. Cultures inoculated with samples obtained from lymph-node FNAB and bioptic material from necropsied organs revealed the presence of pure cultures of Penicillium, subsequently identified as P. purpurogenum. Apart from female GSD's suspected predisposition to disseminated mycoses described in literature, no other predisposing factors were ascertained in this case.
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ZANATTA R; MINISCALCO B; GUARDO J; GENE' J; CAPUCCHIO M.T; GALLO G; MIKULICICH B; PEANO A
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/103059
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