Background. The lower respiratory tract is a latency site of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV); however, its pathogenic role is poorly known, particularly in transplant patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and role of EBV in bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) from transplant recipients (TR) in comparison with nontransplant (NT) patients. Methods. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for EBV, human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6), and HHV-7 and rapid shell-vial culture for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) were performed on 272 consecutive BAL from 194 patients (107 from 59 TR and 165 from 143 NT). Results. EBV-DNA was positive in 65 specimens (23.9%) from 57 patients (29.4%): 24 of 59 (40.7%) TR and 33 of 143 (23.1%)NT(P_0.05). There was no significant difference of EBV positivity considering the type of transplanted organ. Viral load did not significantly differ comparing specimens of TR versus NT, specimens of solid organ transplant versus bone marrow transplant recipients. EBV was frequently positive in patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia (28.6%), respiratory insufficiency (24.5%), and exacerbation of underlying bronchopneumopathies (30.8%); however, there was no difference comparing TR and NT. EBV was mostly detected in concomitance with other infectious pathogens. Mortality within 28 days of BAL sampling was not related to EBV-DNA positivity and load. Conclusions. EBV is frequently detected in BAL from TR and NT; however, its pathogenic role in lower respiratory tract remains poorly known, also because of the frequent detection of concomitant infectious pathogens. Further studies are needed to better elucidate this issue and the underlying local conditions favoring viral replication.

Quantitative detection of Epstein-Barr virus in bronchoalveolar lavage from transplant and non-transplant patients

Costa C.;ELIA, Maria Teresa;SIDOTI, Francesca;TERLIZZI, Maria Elena;Solidoro P.;BERGALLO, Massimiliano;CAVALLO, Rossana
2008

Abstract

Background. The lower respiratory tract is a latency site of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV); however, its pathogenic role is poorly known, particularly in transplant patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and role of EBV in bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) from transplant recipients (TR) in comparison with nontransplant (NT) patients. Methods. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for EBV, human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6), and HHV-7 and rapid shell-vial culture for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) were performed on 272 consecutive BAL from 194 patients (107 from 59 TR and 165 from 143 NT). Results. EBV-DNA was positive in 65 specimens (23.9%) from 57 patients (29.4%): 24 of 59 (40.7%) TR and 33 of 143 (23.1%)NT(P_0.05). There was no significant difference of EBV positivity considering the type of transplanted organ. Viral load did not significantly differ comparing specimens of TR versus NT, specimens of solid organ transplant versus bone marrow transplant recipients. EBV was frequently positive in patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia (28.6%), respiratory insufficiency (24.5%), and exacerbation of underlying bronchopneumopathies (30.8%); however, there was no difference comparing TR and NT. EBV was mostly detected in concomitance with other infectious pathogens. Mortality within 28 days of BAL sampling was not related to EBV-DNA positivity and load. Conclusions. EBV is frequently detected in BAL from TR and NT; however, its pathogenic role in lower respiratory tract remains poorly known, also because of the frequent detection of concomitant infectious pathogens. Further studies are needed to better elucidate this issue and the underlying local conditions favoring viral replication.
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Bronchoalveolar lavage; Epstein-Barr virus; Pneumonia; Respiratory insufficiency; Transplantation; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid; DNA, Viral; Epstein-Barr Virus Infections; Female; Herpesvirus 4, Human; Herpesvirus 6, Human; Herpesvirus 7, Human; Humans; Lung Transplantation; Male; Middle Aged; Pneumonia, Viral; Respiratory Insufficiency; Retrospective Studies; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Roseolovirus Infections; Viral Load; Young Adult; Transplantation
Costa C.; Elia M.; Astegiano S.; Sidoti F.; Terlizzi M.E.; Solidoro P.; Botto S.; Libertucci D.; Bergallo M.; Cavallo R.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/103825
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