Epidemiological studies of particulate matter (PM) have associated PM mass, as well as certain individual components of PM such as secondary particulate with adverse human health effects. For example genotoxic effects attributed to PM may relate to the content of organic compounds but also to the oxidative DNA damage generated by transition metals like iron. However the exact physiochemical mechanism by which PM produces adverse effects is not clear. The aims of this study were to evaluate (1) concentrations of PM10, (2) amounts of bioavailable iron associated with PM10, (3) amounts of secondary particulate expressed as sulfates and nitrates and (4) the mutagenic activities of PM10 organic extracts. Sampling was carried out in a meteochemical station located in Torino, a northern Italian city with high levels of PM10. The mean PM10 concentration in the considered period was 46.1± 28.8 microg/c.m., the iron mean concentrationwas 0.83 microg/cubic meter (± 0.65 microg/cubic meter) and the bioavailable Fe was 5.7%(± 4.4%). The data showed that secondary particulate matter (as sum of sulfates and nitrates) constituted about 47% of PM10 total mass. Both iron and secondary species concentrations were positively associated with PM10 levels. Seasonal variations of PM10 concentration, iron level and secondary species amount were significant. Samples were tested for mutagenicity with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100, with and without metabolic activation and a positive response was observed especially for TA98. There were positive statistical associations between mutagenicity andPM10, bioavailable iron, sulfates and nitrates concentrations. Therefore, these results showed the usefulness of this biological approach for monitoring PM10.

Chemical characteristics and mutagenic activity of PM10 in Torino, a Northern Italian City

GILLI, Giorgio;TRAVERSI, Deborah;ROVERE, Renato;PIGNATA, Cristina;SCHILIRO', Tiziana
2007

Abstract

Epidemiological studies of particulate matter (PM) have associated PM mass, as well as certain individual components of PM such as secondary particulate with adverse human health effects. For example genotoxic effects attributed to PM may relate to the content of organic compounds but also to the oxidative DNA damage generated by transition metals like iron. However the exact physiochemical mechanism by which PM produces adverse effects is not clear. The aims of this study were to evaluate (1) concentrations of PM10, (2) amounts of bioavailable iron associated with PM10, (3) amounts of secondary particulate expressed as sulfates and nitrates and (4) the mutagenic activities of PM10 organic extracts. Sampling was carried out in a meteochemical station located in Torino, a northern Italian city with high levels of PM10. The mean PM10 concentration in the considered period was 46.1± 28.8 microg/c.m., the iron mean concentrationwas 0.83 microg/cubic meter (± 0.65 microg/cubic meter) and the bioavailable Fe was 5.7%(± 4.4%). The data showed that secondary particulate matter (as sum of sulfates and nitrates) constituted about 47% of PM10 total mass. Both iron and secondary species concentrations were positively associated with PM10 levels. Seasonal variations of PM10 concentration, iron level and secondary species amount were significant. Samples were tested for mutagenicity with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100, with and without metabolic activation and a positive response was observed especially for TA98. There were positive statistical associations between mutagenicity andPM10, bioavailable iron, sulfates and nitrates concentrations. Therefore, these results showed the usefulness of this biological approach for monitoring PM10.
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G. GILLI; D. TRAVERSI; R. ROVERE; C. PIGNATA; T. SCHILIRO'
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/103875
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