Since hyperglycemia is involved in the "aspirin resistance" occurring in diabetes, we aimed at evaluating whether high glucose interferes with the aspirin-induced inhibition of thromboxane synthesis and/or activation of the nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) pathway in platelets. For this purpose, in platelets from 60 healthy volunteers incubated for 60 min with 5-25 mmol/L d-glucose or iso-osmolar mannitol, we evaluated the influence of a 30-min incubation with lysine acetylsalicylate (L-ASA; 1-300 μmol/L) on 1) platelet function under shear stress; 2) aggregation induced by sodium arachidonate or ADP; 3) agonist-induced thromboxane production; and 4) NO production, cGMP synthesis, and PKG-induced vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation. Experiments were repeated in the presence of the antioxidant agent amifostine. We observed that platelet exposure to 25 mmol/L d-glucose, but not to iso-osmolar mannitol, 1) reduced the ability of L-ASA to inhibit platelet responses to agonists; 2) did not modify the L-ASA-induced inhibition of thromboxane synthesis; and 3) prevented the L-ASA-induced activation of the NO/cGMP/PKG pathway. Preincubation with amifostine reversed the high-glucose effects. Thus, high glucose acutely reduces the antiaggregating effect of aspirin, does not modify the aspirin-induced inhibition of thromboxane synthesis, and inhibits the aspirin-induced activation of the NO/cGMP/PKG pathway. These results identify a mechanism by which high glucose interferes with the aspirin action.

High Glucose Inhibits the Aspirin-Induced Activation of the Nitric Oxide/cGMP/cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Pathway and Does Not Affect the Aspirin-Induced Inhibition of Thromboxane Synthesis in Human Platelets.

RUSSO, Isabella;VIRETTO, MICHELA;BARALE, CRISTINA;MATTIELLO, Luigi;DORONZO, GABRIELLA;PAGLIARINO, Andrea;TROVATI, Mariella;ANFOSSI, Giovanni
2012-01-01

Abstract

Since hyperglycemia is involved in the "aspirin resistance" occurring in diabetes, we aimed at evaluating whether high glucose interferes with the aspirin-induced inhibition of thromboxane synthesis and/or activation of the nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) pathway in platelets. For this purpose, in platelets from 60 healthy volunteers incubated for 60 min with 5-25 mmol/L d-glucose or iso-osmolar mannitol, we evaluated the influence of a 30-min incubation with lysine acetylsalicylate (L-ASA; 1-300 μmol/L) on 1) platelet function under shear stress; 2) aggregation induced by sodium arachidonate or ADP; 3) agonist-induced thromboxane production; and 4) NO production, cGMP synthesis, and PKG-induced vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation. Experiments were repeated in the presence of the antioxidant agent amifostine. We observed that platelet exposure to 25 mmol/L d-glucose, but not to iso-osmolar mannitol, 1) reduced the ability of L-ASA to inhibit platelet responses to agonists; 2) did not modify the L-ASA-induced inhibition of thromboxane synthesis; and 3) prevented the L-ASA-induced activation of the NO/cGMP/PKG pathway. Preincubation with amifostine reversed the high-glucose effects. Thus, high glucose acutely reduces the antiaggregating effect of aspirin, does not modify the aspirin-induced inhibition of thromboxane synthesis, and inhibits the aspirin-induced activation of the NO/cGMP/PKG pathway. These results identify a mechanism by which high glucose interferes with the aspirin action.
2012
61
11
2913
2921
high glucose; aspirin resistance; nitric oxide; thromboxane; diabetes mellitus
Russo I; Viretto M; Barale C; Mattiello L; Doronzo G; Pagliarino A; Cavalot F; Trovati M; Anfossi G.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/118245
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 9
  • Scopus 27
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 23
social impact