PURPOSE: The Advance Directives (ADs) have been adopted in many countries to defend patients' autonomy. In Italy, the role of ADs has recently been the subject of heated debate involving political parties and the Roman Catholic Church. In February 2009, the conservative government coalition presented a bill of law on this issue. It has been passed by the Low Chamber and is now being discussed in the Senate. The purpose of the article is to highlight any possible bill's contradiction with Italian Constitution, Italian Code of Medical Ethics (ICME), and Oviedo Convention contents, relevant for intensivists. METHODS: Analysis of bill's content in the light of Italian Constitution, ICME, Oviedo Convention articles and in comparison with French legislation regarding end of life (Leonetti law). RESULTS: In the Authors' point of view the bill's articles -limit the moral and judicial importance of four main issues as informed consent, permanent incapacity, artificial nutrition/hydration, and withdraw/withhold treatments. CONCLUSIONS: In the Authors' opinion the ADs must represent informed preferences made freely by patients within the relationship with their physicians, as part of an advance care planning. When this relationship develops in accordance with the ICME rules, it contains all of the ethical/professional dimensions to legitimate right choices in each case. The law should draw inspiration from ICME principles, assigning them a juridical power, acknowledging their validity in legitimating end-of-life decisions, and defining a framework of juridical legitimacy for these decisions without infringing on patients' right to autonomy with prescriptions on the care.

Regulation of advance directives in Italy: a bad law in the making.

MARTIN, ERICA LEANNE;RANIERI, Vito Marco
2012

Abstract

PURPOSE: The Advance Directives (ADs) have been adopted in many countries to defend patients' autonomy. In Italy, the role of ADs has recently been the subject of heated debate involving political parties and the Roman Catholic Church. In February 2009, the conservative government coalition presented a bill of law on this issue. It has been passed by the Low Chamber and is now being discussed in the Senate. The purpose of the article is to highlight any possible bill's contradiction with Italian Constitution, Italian Code of Medical Ethics (ICME), and Oviedo Convention contents, relevant for intensivists. METHODS: Analysis of bill's content in the light of Italian Constitution, ICME, Oviedo Convention articles and in comparison with French legislation regarding end of life (Leonetti law). RESULTS: In the Authors' point of view the bill's articles -limit the moral and judicial importance of four main issues as informed consent, permanent incapacity, artificial nutrition/hydration, and withdraw/withhold treatments. CONCLUSIONS: In the Authors' opinion the ADs must represent informed preferences made freely by patients within the relationship with their physicians, as part of an advance care planning. When this relationship develops in accordance with the ICME rules, it contains all of the ethical/professional dimensions to legitimate right choices in each case. The law should draw inspiration from ICME principles, assigning them a juridical power, acknowledging their validity in legitimating end-of-life decisions, and defining a framework of juridical legitimacy for these decisions without infringing on patients' right to autonomy with prescriptions on the care.
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Gristina GR; Martin E; Ranieri VM.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/126461
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