To determine whether abnormalities of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function occur in type I diabetes mellitus, corticotropin, cortisol, 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), androstenedione (D4-A), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and DHEA sulfate (DS) levels were measured after an intravenous (IV) injection of 1 microgram/kg human corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in diabetic adolescents and normal age-matched subjects. CRH produced a consistent increase in corticotropin blood levels that was comparable in the two groups. In contrast, both baseline and stimulated cortisol concentrations were greater in diabetic patients. Levels of 17-OHP increased after CRH administration, and the magnitude of increase was similar in all subjects. Stimulation with CRH determined an attenuated integrated DS response in diabetics compared with normal subjects with a different pattern of the hormone secretion, whereas no differences in D4-A concentrations were detected between the two groups. DHEA serum levels of subjects from both groups underwent similar changes following administration of CRH. In conclusion, patients with type I diabetes have a discrete response of adrenal steroids to CRH stimulation that appears to be independent of corticotropin secretion. This phenomenon might be related to a direct effect of insulin on enzyme systems involved in the biosynthetic pathway of adrenal steroids or, alternatively, to an intra-adrenal CRH/corticotropin mechanism acting on the adrenal cortex in a paracrine manner.

Adrenal steroid and adrenocorticotropin responses to human corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test in adolescents with type I diabetes mellitus.

GHIZZONI, Lucia;
1993

Abstract

To determine whether abnormalities of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function occur in type I diabetes mellitus, corticotropin, cortisol, 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), androstenedione (D4-A), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and DHEA sulfate (DS) levels were measured after an intravenous (IV) injection of 1 microgram/kg human corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in diabetic adolescents and normal age-matched subjects. CRH produced a consistent increase in corticotropin blood levels that was comparable in the two groups. In contrast, both baseline and stimulated cortisol concentrations were greater in diabetic patients. Levels of 17-OHP increased after CRH administration, and the magnitude of increase was similar in all subjects. Stimulation with CRH determined an attenuated integrated DS response in diabetics compared with normal subjects with a different pattern of the hormone secretion, whereas no differences in D4-A concentrations were detected between the two groups. DHEA serum levels of subjects from both groups underwent similar changes following administration of CRH. In conclusion, patients with type I diabetes have a discrete response of adrenal steroids to CRH stimulation that appears to be independent of corticotropin secretion. This phenomenon might be related to a direct effect of insulin on enzyme systems involved in the biosynthetic pathway of adrenal steroids or, alternatively, to an intra-adrenal CRH/corticotropin mechanism acting on the adrenal cortex in a paracrine manner.
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9
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1145
Ghizzoni L;Vanelli M;Virdis R;Alberini A;Volta C;Bernasconi S
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/132466
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