Nanometric TiO2 is largely employed in cosmetics, but in vitro toxic effects have been reported when nano-TiO2 is exposed to UV light. The photoreactivity of TiO2 largely depends on its crystal phase, namely, anatase and rutile. Surface acidity, which is also dependent on crystal structure, may impart a positive or negative charge to the nanomaterial surface and ultimately modulate particle adhesion to tissues. Three nanometric TiO2 powders with a different crystal lattice and surface charge (anatase, rutile, and anatase/rutile) have been employed here to investigate their interaction with the skin and to examine the molecular mechanisms of the TiO2-induced oxidative damage. The strength of the interaction of nano-TiO2 with skin has been revealed by chemiometric mapping (μ-XRF and SEM–EDS) after tissue washing. Positively charged anatase and anatase/rutile, but not negatively charged rutile, were strongly held on the skin surface and were able to promote a structural rearrangement of the lipid bilayer in the stratum corneum (DSC and Raman) under controlled indoor illumination (UVA < 1 mW/m2). Under the same conditions, cell-free reactivity tests (ROS-mediated free-radical release and lipoperoxidation) indicated that anatase and anatase/rutile are more reactive than rutile, suggesting a ROS-mediated oxidative mechanism that may alter the structure of the stratum corneum. Both the higher oxidative potential and the stronger adhesion to skin of anatase and anatase/rutile TiO2 may explain the stronger disorganization induced by these two samples and suggests the use of rutile to produce safer TiO2-based cosmetic and pharmaceutical products.

Crystalline Phase Modulates the Potency of Nanometric TiO2 to Adhere to and Perturb the Stratum Corneum of Porcine Skin under Indoor Light

TURCI, Francesco;PEIRA, Elena;CORAZZARI, INGRID;FENOGLIO, Ivana;TROTTA, Michele;FUBINI, Bice
2013

Abstract

Nanometric TiO2 is largely employed in cosmetics, but in vitro toxic effects have been reported when nano-TiO2 is exposed to UV light. The photoreactivity of TiO2 largely depends on its crystal phase, namely, anatase and rutile. Surface acidity, which is also dependent on crystal structure, may impart a positive or negative charge to the nanomaterial surface and ultimately modulate particle adhesion to tissues. Three nanometric TiO2 powders with a different crystal lattice and surface charge (anatase, rutile, and anatase/rutile) have been employed here to investigate their interaction with the skin and to examine the molecular mechanisms of the TiO2-induced oxidative damage. The strength of the interaction of nano-TiO2 with skin has been revealed by chemiometric mapping (μ-XRF and SEM–EDS) after tissue washing. Positively charged anatase and anatase/rutile, but not negatively charged rutile, were strongly held on the skin surface and were able to promote a structural rearrangement of the lipid bilayer in the stratum corneum (DSC and Raman) under controlled indoor illumination (UVA < 1 mW/m2). Under the same conditions, cell-free reactivity tests (ROS-mediated free-radical release and lipoperoxidation) indicated that anatase and anatase/rutile are more reactive than rutile, suggesting a ROS-mediated oxidative mechanism that may alter the structure of the stratum corneum. Both the higher oxidative potential and the stronger adhesion to skin of anatase and anatase/rutile TiO2 may explain the stronger disorganization induced by these two samples and suggests the use of rutile to produce safer TiO2-based cosmetic and pharmaceutical products.
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http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/tx400285j
Francesco Turci;Elena Peira;Ingrid Corazzari;Ivana Fenoglio;Michele Trotta;Bice Fubini
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/139339
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