Background Perineural fibrotic adhesions are among the major complications of peripheral nerve surgery. While different experimental models have been used for the pre-clinical testing of anti-adherential strategies, the methods used so far to induce scar tissue appear to be poorly standardized and reproducible. New method Thirty adult mice were used. Two methods were tested: the first one is based on burning the perineural muscular bed with a diathermocoagulator, while the second is based on direct scratching of the nerve surface with a cotton swab. After 3 weeks, the fibrotic reaction was assessed by measuring the peak pull out force of the nerve from muscular bed by means of a new tool specifically devised for biomechanical assessment of scar tissue formation. Moreover, histological analysis with specific collagen stain was also carried out. Results Both methods produced fibrotic reaction. Statistical analysis of biomechanical data showed a significant difference between burning and scratching group compared to the control sham operated group. No significant differences were detected between burning and scratching group. Histological analysis showed the presence of perineural scar tissue in both groups, though with a different distribution pattern. Comparison with other methods This protocol is easier to perform. The tool used for biomechanical evaluation is reliable and cheap. Conclusions Both methods for perineural scar formation are effective and simple. They represent reproducible models for the study of the anti-adherential strategies. Yet, biomechanical testing with the device that we have developed proved to be a reliable and simple method for the quantitative assessment of the degree of perineural adhesion formation.

A simple and reliable method to perform biomechanical evaluation of postoperative nerve adhesions.

CROSIO, Alessandro;PASCAL, DAVIDE;GEUNA, Stefano;TOS, PIERLUIGI
2014

Abstract

Background Perineural fibrotic adhesions are among the major complications of peripheral nerve surgery. While different experimental models have been used for the pre-clinical testing of anti-adherential strategies, the methods used so far to induce scar tissue appear to be poorly standardized and reproducible. New method Thirty adult mice were used. Two methods were tested: the first one is based on burning the perineural muscular bed with a diathermocoagulator, while the second is based on direct scratching of the nerve surface with a cotton swab. After 3 weeks, the fibrotic reaction was assessed by measuring the peak pull out force of the nerve from muscular bed by means of a new tool specifically devised for biomechanical assessment of scar tissue formation. Moreover, histological analysis with specific collagen stain was also carried out. Results Both methods produced fibrotic reaction. Statistical analysis of biomechanical data showed a significant difference between burning and scratching group compared to the control sham operated group. No significant differences were detected between burning and scratching group. Histological analysis showed the presence of perineural scar tissue in both groups, though with a different distribution pattern. Comparison with other methods This protocol is easier to perform. The tool used for biomechanical evaluation is reliable and cheap. Conclusions Both methods for perineural scar formation are effective and simple. They represent reproducible models for the study of the anti-adherential strategies. Yet, biomechanical testing with the device that we have developed proved to be a reliable and simple method for the quantitative assessment of the degree of perineural adhesion formation.
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Alessandro Crosio; Luigi Valdatta; Mario Cherubino; Matteo Izzo; Igor Pellegatta; Davide Pascal; Stefano Geuna; Pierluigi Tos
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1506160
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