Police integrity, or the lack thereof, is a frequent topic throughout media, academia, and all law enforcement organizations. The issue has been addressed on an individual and organizational level but continues to raise as many questions as it answers. One argument is that police training causes declination in recruits’ values, which eventually leads to officers acting in unethical ways. The present study examined the extent to which police academy training impacts recruits’ self-reported integrity, which was measured at the beginning and end of academy training. Three different training formats (n1 = 143, n2 = 87, n3 = 27) were observed, social desirability was assessed to control for response bias, and self-reported emotional intelligence was measured as a potential moderator variable. Results indicated that participants started with significantly higher than average levels of integrity (with Cohen’s d values ranging from.56 to.83) and training had no significant impact on their integrity scores, even when corrected for social desirability. The results were not impacted by the length of training, pre-academy level of emotional intelligence, or a variety of demographic variables. The study encourages law enforcement organizations to focus on ways to help their employees maintain high levels of ethical decision making

Impact of Police Academy Training on Recruits' Integrity

GIROMINI, Luciano;
2016

Abstract

Police integrity, or the lack thereof, is a frequent topic throughout media, academia, and all law enforcement organizations. The issue has been addressed on an individual and organizational level but continues to raise as many questions as it answers. One argument is that police training causes declination in recruits’ values, which eventually leads to officers acting in unethical ways. The present study examined the extent to which police academy training impacts recruits’ self-reported integrity, which was measured at the beginning and end of academy training. Three different training formats (n1 = 143, n2 = 87, n3 = 27) were observed, social desirability was assessed to control for response bias, and self-reported emotional intelligence was measured as a potential moderator variable. Results indicated that participants started with significantly higher than average levels of integrity (with Cohen’s d values ranging from.56 to.83) and training had no significant impact on their integrity scores, even when corrected for social desirability. The results were not impacted by the length of training, pre-academy level of emotional intelligence, or a variety of demographic variables. The study encourages law enforcement organizations to focus on ways to help their employees maintain high levels of ethical decision making
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Blumberg, D. M.; Giromini, L.; Jacobson, L. B.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1543355
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