Hormonal changes during the reproductive cycle are thought to account for the variation in migraine occurrence and intensity. Although the majority of women and the specialists treating them do not consider migraine as a component of the climacteric syndrome, many women, in fact, do experience migraine during perimenopause. If a woman already suffers from migraine, the attacks often worsen during menopausal transition. Initial onset of the condition during this period is relatively rare. Women with the premenstrual syndrome (PMS) prior to entering menopause are more likely to experience, during late menopausal transition, an increased prevalence of migraine attacks. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can be initiated during the late premenopausal phase and the first years of postmenopause to relieve climacteric symptoms. The effect of HRT on migraine, either as a secondary effect of the therapy or as a preventive measure against perimenopausal migraine, has been variously investigated. HRT preparations should be administered continuously, without intervals, to prevent sudden estrogen deprivation and the migraine attacks that will ensue. Wide varieties of formulations, both systemic and topical, are available. Treatment with transdermal patches and estradiol-based gels is preferable to oral formulations as they maintain constant blood hormone levels. Natural menopause is associated with a lower incidence of migraine as compared with surgical menopause; data on the role of hysterectomy alone or associated with ovariectomy in changing the occurrence of migraine are till now unclear.

Migraine in perimenopausal women

ALLAIS, GIOVANNI BATTISTA;CHIARLE, GIULIA;BENEDETTO, Chiara
Last
2015

Abstract

Hormonal changes during the reproductive cycle are thought to account for the variation in migraine occurrence and intensity. Although the majority of women and the specialists treating them do not consider migraine as a component of the climacteric syndrome, many women, in fact, do experience migraine during perimenopause. If a woman already suffers from migraine, the attacks often worsen during menopausal transition. Initial onset of the condition during this period is relatively rare. Women with the premenstrual syndrome (PMS) prior to entering menopause are more likely to experience, during late menopausal transition, an increased prevalence of migraine attacks. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can be initiated during the late premenopausal phase and the first years of postmenopause to relieve climacteric symptoms. The effect of HRT on migraine, either as a secondary effect of the therapy or as a preventive measure against perimenopausal migraine, has been variously investigated. HRT preparations should be administered continuously, without intervals, to prevent sudden estrogen deprivation and the migraine attacks that will ensue. Wide varieties of formulations, both systemic and topical, are available. Treatment with transdermal patches and estradiol-based gels is preferable to oral formulations as they maintain constant blood hormone levels. Natural menopause is associated with a lower incidence of migraine as compared with surgical menopause; data on the role of hysterectomy alone or associated with ovariectomy in changing the occurrence of migraine are till now unclear.
36
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83
link.springer.de/link/service/journals/10072/index.htm
Hormone replacement therapy; Menopause; Migraine; Surgical menopause; Female; Humans; Migraine Disorders; Perimenopause; Premenstrual Syndrome; Neurology (clinical); Psychiatry and Mental Health; 2708; Medicine (all)
Allais, G; Chiarle, G.; Bergandi, F.; Benedetto, C.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1578104
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