This review focuses on the main acoustic adaptations that have evolved to enhance social communication in ants. We also describe how other invertebrates mimic these acoustic signals in order to coexist with ants in the case of mutualistic myrmecophiles, or, in the case of social parasites, corrupt them in order to infiltrate ant societies and exploit their resources. New data suggest that the strength of each ant–myrmecophile interaction leads to distinctive sound profiles and may be a better predictor of the similarity of sound between different myrmecophilous species than their phylogenetic distance. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary significance of vibrations produced by specialized myrmecophiles in the context of ant multimodal communication involving the use of chemical and acoustic signals in combination and identify future challenges for research including how new technology might allow a better understanding of the study systems.

Acoustic communication within ant societies and its mimicry by mutualistic and socially parasitic myrmecophiles

BARBERO, Francesca;CASACCI, LUCA PIETRO;
2017

Abstract

This review focuses on the main acoustic adaptations that have evolved to enhance social communication in ants. We also describe how other invertebrates mimic these acoustic signals in order to coexist with ants in the case of mutualistic myrmecophiles, or, in the case of social parasites, corrupt them in order to infiltrate ant societies and exploit their resources. New data suggest that the strength of each ant–myrmecophile interaction leads to distinctive sound profiles and may be a better predictor of the similarity of sound between different myrmecophilous species than their phylogenetic distance. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary significance of vibrations produced by specialized myrmecophiles in the context of ant multimodal communication involving the use of chemical and acoustic signals in combination and identify future challenges for research including how new technology might allow a better understanding of the study systems.
134
249
256
acoustic communication, ants, mutualists, social parasites, social structure
Schönrogge, K.; Barbero, F.; Casacci, L.P.; Settele, J.; Thomas, J.A.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Schonrogge et al Anim Behav Manuscript_post_print.pdf

embargo fino al 22/11/2018

Descrizione: MS versione autore
Tipo di file: POSTPRINT (VERSIONE FINALE DELL’AUTORE)
Dimensione 1.52 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.52 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Schonrogge et al 2016.pdf

non disponibili

Descrizione: PDF Editoriale
Tipo di file: PDF EDITORIALE
Dimensione 1.66 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.66 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
AB_2017.pdf

non disponibili

Tipo di file: PDF EDITORIALE
Dimensione 1.69 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.69 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1615259
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 16
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 15
social impact