Reconciliation is defined as the first postconflict affinitive contact between former opponents. While reconciliation in anthropoid primates has been widely investigated, few studies have focused on postconflict mechanisms in prosimians, and only in captivity. Unlike anthropoids, Malagasy prosimians show female dominance, lack of sexual dimorphism and seasonal breeding. However, they share features with anthropoids such as cohesive societies, female philopatry and individual recognition. Comparing social prosimians with anthropoids is crucial for understanding the evolution of reconciliation dynamics. Here we present the first study on reconciliation in a wild prosimian. We focused on the Propithecus verreauxi (sifaka) of the Berenty forest (southern Madagascar). We examined postconflict behaviour in the light of theoretical expectations based on potential costs and benefits of the individuals involved. Our results indicate that P. verreauxi can evaluate possible risks and benefits of engaging in postconflict reunions. Victims were most likely to interact affinitively with the aggressor after low-intensity aggression. Moreover, only the conflicts occurring outside the feeding context were reconciled. Such results are consonant with the fact that, in P. verreauxi, social dominance is translated more into feeding priority than into a framework of despotic relationships. In agreement with the valuable relationship hypothesis, P. verreauxi were more likely to reconcile with valuable partners: reconciliation preferentially occurred between subordinates and top-ranking individuals, and between animals sharing good relationships (high levels of affinitive behaviours). Over the short term, reconciliation in P

Peacemaking on treetops: first evidence of reconciliation from a wild prosimian (Propithecus verreauxi)

Norscia, Ivan
2008-01-01

Abstract

Reconciliation is defined as the first postconflict affinitive contact between former opponents. While reconciliation in anthropoid primates has been widely investigated, few studies have focused on postconflict mechanisms in prosimians, and only in captivity. Unlike anthropoids, Malagasy prosimians show female dominance, lack of sexual dimorphism and seasonal breeding. However, they share features with anthropoids such as cohesive societies, female philopatry and individual recognition. Comparing social prosimians with anthropoids is crucial for understanding the evolution of reconciliation dynamics. Here we present the first study on reconciliation in a wild prosimian. We focused on the Propithecus verreauxi (sifaka) of the Berenty forest (southern Madagascar). We examined postconflict behaviour in the light of theoretical expectations based on potential costs and benefits of the individuals involved. Our results indicate that P. verreauxi can evaluate possible risks and benefits of engaging in postconflict reunions. Victims were most likely to interact affinitively with the aggressor after low-intensity aggression. Moreover, only the conflicts occurring outside the feeding context were reconciled. Such results are consonant with the fact that, in P. verreauxi, social dominance is translated more into feeding priority than into a framework of despotic relationships. In agreement with the valuable relationship hypothesis, P. verreauxi were more likely to reconcile with valuable partners: reconciliation preferentially occurred between subordinates and top-ranking individuals, and between animals sharing good relationships (high levels of affinitive behaviours). Over the short term, reconciliation in P
2008
76
3
737
747
conflict resolution; good relationships; lemur; Madagascar; Propithecus verreauxi; valuable relationship hypothesis; Verreaux's sifaka; Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics; Animal Science and Zoology
Palagi, Elisabetta; Antonacci, Daniela; Norscia, Ivan
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1652909
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