A newly proposed form of brain structural plasticity consists of non-newly generated, "immature" neurons of the adult cerebral cortex. Similar to newly generated neurons, these cells express the cytoskeletal protein Doublecortin (DCX), yet they are generated prenatally, then remaining in a state of immaturity for long periods. In rodents, the immature neurons are restricted to the paleocortex, whereas in other mammals are found also in neocortex. Here, we analyzed the DCX-expressing cells in the whole sheep brain of both sexes, to search for an indicator of structural plasticity at a cellular level in a relatively large-brained, long-living mammal. Brains from adult and newborn sheep (injected with BrdU and analyzed at different survival times) were processed for DCX, cell proliferation markers (Ki-67, BrdU), pallial/subpallial developmental origin (Tbr1, Sp8), and neuronal/glial antigens for phenotype characterization. We found immature-like neurons in the whole sheep cortex and in large populations of DCX-expressing cells within the external capsule and the surrounding grey matter (claustrum and amygdala). BrdU and Ki-67 detection at neonatal and adult ages showed that all these DCX+ cells were generated during embryogenesis, not after birth. These results show that the adult sheep, unlike rodents, is largely endowed with non-newly generated neurons retaining immature features, suggesting that such kind of plasticity might be particularly important in large brained, long living mammals.

Non-newly generated, "immature" neurons in the sheep brain are not restricted to cerebral cortex

Chiara La Rosa;Paola Crociara;Roberta Parolisi;Federico Luzzati;Luca Bonfanti
2018-01-01

Abstract

A newly proposed form of brain structural plasticity consists of non-newly generated, "immature" neurons of the adult cerebral cortex. Similar to newly generated neurons, these cells express the cytoskeletal protein Doublecortin (DCX), yet they are generated prenatally, then remaining in a state of immaturity for long periods. In rodents, the immature neurons are restricted to the paleocortex, whereas in other mammals are found also in neocortex. Here, we analyzed the DCX-expressing cells in the whole sheep brain of both sexes, to search for an indicator of structural plasticity at a cellular level in a relatively large-brained, long-living mammal. Brains from adult and newborn sheep (injected with BrdU and analyzed at different survival times) were processed for DCX, cell proliferation markers (Ki-67, BrdU), pallial/subpallial developmental origin (Tbr1, Sp8), and neuronal/glial antigens for phenotype characterization. We found immature-like neurons in the whole sheep cortex and in large populations of DCX-expressing cells within the external capsule and the surrounding grey matter (claustrum and amygdala). BrdU and Ki-67 detection at neonatal and adult ages showed that all these DCX+ cells were generated during embryogenesis, not after birth. These results show that the adult sheep, unlike rodents, is largely endowed with non-newly generated neurons retaining immature features, suggesting that such kind of plasticity might be particularly important in large brained, long living mammals.
2018
38
826
842
http://www.jneurosci.org/content/38/4/826
Plasticity, Immature neurons, Doublecortin, Postnatal development, Cerebral cortex
Matteo, Piumatti; Ottavia, Palazzo; LA ROSA, Chiara; Crociara, Paola; Parolisi, Roberta; Luzzati, Federico; Frederic, Levy; Bonfanti, Luca
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1653592
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