The Inventory of Problems–29 (IOP-29) was recently introduced as a brief, easy-to-use measure of non-credible mental and cognitive symptoms that may be applied to a wide variety of contexts or clinical conditions. The current study compared its validity in discriminating bona fide versus feigned (via experimental malingering paradigm) psychopathology against that of the Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology (SIMS). Specifically, 452 Italian adult volunteers participated in this study: 216 were individuals with mental illness who were asked to take the SIMS and IOP-29 honestly, and 236 were nonclinical participants (experimental simulators) who took the same two tests with the instruction to feign a psychopathological condition. Two main, broad categories of symptom presentations were investigated: (a) psychotic spectrum disorders and (b) anxiety, depression, and/or trauma-related disorders. Data analysis compared the effect sizes of the differences between the patients and experimental simulators, as well as the AUC and classification accuracy statistics for both the SIMS and IOP-29. The results indicate that the IOP-29 outperformed the SIMS, with the differences between the two tools being more notable within the psychotic (IOP-29 vs. SIMS: d = − 1.80 vs. d = − 1.06; AUC = .89 vs. AUC = .79) than within the anxiety, depression, and/or trauma related subgroup (IOP-29 vs. SIMS: d = − 2.02 vs. d = − 1.62; AUC = .90 vs. AUC = .86). This study also demonstrates that the IOP-29, with its single cutoff score, is generalizable culturally and linguistically from the USA (English) to Italy (Italian).

A Clinical Comparison, Simulation Study Testing the Validity of SIMS and IOP-29 with an Italian Sample

Giromini, Luciano;Pignolo, Claudia;Zennaro, Alessandro
2018

Abstract

The Inventory of Problems–29 (IOP-29) was recently introduced as a brief, easy-to-use measure of non-credible mental and cognitive symptoms that may be applied to a wide variety of contexts or clinical conditions. The current study compared its validity in discriminating bona fide versus feigned (via experimental malingering paradigm) psychopathology against that of the Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology (SIMS). Specifically, 452 Italian adult volunteers participated in this study: 216 were individuals with mental illness who were asked to take the SIMS and IOP-29 honestly, and 236 were nonclinical participants (experimental simulators) who took the same two tests with the instruction to feign a psychopathological condition. Two main, broad categories of symptom presentations were investigated: (a) psychotic spectrum disorders and (b) anxiety, depression, and/or trauma-related disorders. Data analysis compared the effect sizes of the differences between the patients and experimental simulators, as well as the AUC and classification accuracy statistics for both the SIMS and IOP-29. The results indicate that the IOP-29 outperformed the SIMS, with the differences between the two tools being more notable within the psychotic (IOP-29 vs. SIMS: d = − 1.80 vs. d = − 1.06; AUC = .89 vs. AUC = .79) than within the anxiety, depression, and/or trauma related subgroup (IOP-29 vs. SIMS: d = − 2.02 vs. d = − 1.62; AUC = .90 vs. AUC = .86). This study also demonstrates that the IOP-29, with its single cutoff score, is generalizable culturally and linguistically from the USA (English) to Italy (Italian).
11
4
340
350
http://www.springer.com/psychology/law+&+psychology/journal/12207
Anxiety; Depression; Inventory of Problems; Malingering; Psychosis; SIMS; Ecology; Psychiatry and Mental Health; Law
Giromini, Luciano; Viglione, Donald J.; Pignolo, Claudia*; Zennaro, Alessandro
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Giromini et al. (2018) A Clinical Comparison, Simulation Study Testing the Validity of SIMS and IOP-29 with an Italian Sample.pdf

Accesso riservato

Tipo di file: PDF EDITORIALE
Dimensione 574.15 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
574.15 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Revised Main Document - SIMS Versus IOP (clean).pdf

Accesso aperto con embargo fino al 01/03/2019

Tipo di file: POSTPRINT (VERSIONE FINALE DELL’AUTORE)
Dimensione 294.29 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
294.29 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Giromini2018_Article_AClinicalComparisonSimulationS.pdf

Accesso riservato

Tipo di file: PDF EDITORIALE
Dimensione 445.82 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
445.82 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1669825
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 34
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 36
social impact