Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have a long history in industrial processes as food starters and biocontrol agents, and also as producers of high-value compounds. Lactic acid, their main product, is among the most requested chemicals because of its multiple applications, including the synthesis of biodegradable plastic polymers. Moreover, LAB are attractive candidates for the production of ethanol, polyhydroalkanoates, sweeteners and exopolysaccharides. LAB generally have complex nutritional requirements. Furthermore, they cannot directly ferment inexpensive feedstocks such as lignocellulose. This significantly increases the cost of LAB fermentation and hinders its application in the production of high volumes of low-cost chemicals. Different strategies have been explored to extend LAB fermentation to lignocellulosic biomass. Fermentation of lignocellulose hydrolysates by LAB has been frequently reported and is the most mature technology. However, current economic constraints of this strategy have driven research for alternative approaches. Co-cultivation of LAB with native cellulolytic microorganisms may reduce the high cost of exogenous cellulase supplementation. Special attention is given in this review to the construction of recombinant cellulolytic LAB by metabolic engineering, which may generate strains able to directly ferment plant biomass. The state of the art of these strategies is illustrated along with perspectives of their applications to industrial second generation biorefinery processes.

Alternative strategies for lignocellulose fermentation through lactic acid bacteria: the state of the art and perspectives

Tarraran Loredana;Mazzoli Roberto
Last
2018

Abstract

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have a long history in industrial processes as food starters and biocontrol agents, and also as producers of high-value compounds. Lactic acid, their main product, is among the most requested chemicals because of its multiple applications, including the synthesis of biodegradable plastic polymers. Moreover, LAB are attractive candidates for the production of ethanol, polyhydroalkanoates, sweeteners and exopolysaccharides. LAB generally have complex nutritional requirements. Furthermore, they cannot directly ferment inexpensive feedstocks such as lignocellulose. This significantly increases the cost of LAB fermentation and hinders its application in the production of high volumes of low-cost chemicals. Different strategies have been explored to extend LAB fermentation to lignocellulosic biomass. Fermentation of lignocellulose hydrolysates by LAB has been frequently reported and is the most mature technology. However, current economic constraints of this strategy have driven research for alternative approaches. Co-cultivation of LAB with native cellulolytic microorganisms may reduce the high cost of exogenous cellulase supplementation. Special attention is given in this review to the construction of recombinant cellulolytic LAB by metabolic engineering, which may generate strains able to directly ferment plant biomass. The state of the art of these strategies is illustrated along with perspectives of their applications to industrial second generation biorefinery processes.
365
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lactobacillus, lactococcus, cellulase, recombinant cellulolytic strategy, metabolic engineering, cellulosome
Tarraran Loredana; Mazzoli Roberto
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1670964
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