Anatomo-clinical evidence from motor-awareness disorders after brain-damages suggests that the premotor cortex (PMC) is involved in motor-monitoring of voluntary actions. Indeed, PMC lesions prevent patients from detecting the mismatch between intended, but not executed, movements with the paralyzed limb. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared, in healthy subjects, free movements against blocked movements, precluded by a cast. Cast-related corticospinal excitability changes were investigated by using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Immediately after the immobilization, when the cast prevented the execution of left-hand movements, the contralateral right (ventral) vPMC showed both increased hemodynamic activity and increased functional connectivity with the hand area in the right somatosensory cortex, suggesting a vPMC involvement in detecting the mismatch between planned and executed movements. Crucially, after 1 week of immobilization, when the motor system had likely learned that no movement could be executed and, therefore, predictions about motor consequences were changed, vPMC did not show the enhanced activity as if no incongruence has to be detected. This can be interpreted as a consequence of the plastic changes induced by long-lasting immobilization, as also proved by the cast-related corticospinal excitability modulation in our subjects. The present findings highlight the crucial role of vPMC in the anatomo-functional network generating the human motor-awareness.

To Move or Not to Move? Functional Role of Ventral Premotor Cortex in Motor Monitoring During Limb Immobilization

Garbarini, Francesca;Bruno, Valentina;Fossataro, Carlotta;Massazza, Giuseppe;Sacco, Katiuscia;Berti, Anna
2018-01-01

Abstract

Anatomo-clinical evidence from motor-awareness disorders after brain-damages suggests that the premotor cortex (PMC) is involved in motor-monitoring of voluntary actions. Indeed, PMC lesions prevent patients from detecting the mismatch between intended, but not executed, movements with the paralyzed limb. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared, in healthy subjects, free movements against blocked movements, precluded by a cast. Cast-related corticospinal excitability changes were investigated by using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Immediately after the immobilization, when the cast prevented the execution of left-hand movements, the contralateral right (ventral) vPMC showed both increased hemodynamic activity and increased functional connectivity with the hand area in the right somatosensory cortex, suggesting a vPMC involvement in detecting the mismatch between planned and executed movements. Crucially, after 1 week of immobilization, when the motor system had likely learned that no movement could be executed and, therefore, predictions about motor consequences were changed, vPMC did not show the enhanced activity as if no incongruence has to be detected. This can be interpreted as a consequence of the plastic changes induced by long-lasting immobilization, as also proved by the cast-related corticospinal excitability modulation in our subjects. The present findings highlight the crucial role of vPMC in the anatomo-functional network generating the human motor-awareness.
2018
Epub ahead of print
-
1
10
Brain plasticity, FMRI, Long-lasting immobilization, Motor control, Premotor cortex
Garbarini, Francesca; Cecchetti, Luca; Bruno, Valentina; Mastropasqua, Angela; Fossataro, Carlotta; Massazza, Giuseppe; Sacco, Katiuscia; Valentini, Maria Consuelo; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Berti, Anna
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1679941
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