Voluntary termination of pregnancy (VTP), pre-conception and post-partum phases, as well as Occupational Medicine consultation for healthcare workers are opportunities for screening and vaccinating rubella seronegative childbearing women. However, data about vaccination acceptance following these phases is rarely reported. A retrospective study over a 2-year period (2016–2017) was performed, evaluating the prevalence of rubella seronegative women which underwent VTP (wVTP), mothers in early puerperal phase (mEPP) and childbearing healthcare workers (CbHW) aged 15–49 years. Anti-rubella vaccination rates and factors associated with vaccine hesitancy (VH) were investigated. Anti-rubella IgG titres were assessed in 8623 women. Seroprevalence of rubella susceptibility was 7.9% (wVTP 6.4%; mEPP 17.4%; CbHW 9.3%). Anti-rubella vaccination rates were found to be different in the three groups (wVTP 37.1%; mEPP 10.9%; CbHW 25.4%), specifically in 2016 and among women born in Italy. VH rate was higher in 2017, especially among wVTP and CbHW. Anti-rubella vaccination rates in wVTP vs. mEPP was higher in women born in Italy but not in those born abroad. Multivariable analyses demonstrated significantly higher risk of VH for mEPP (OR 8.2; 95% CI: 3.9–16.9) and women reporting history of allergy to drugs, food or environmental agents (OR 2.7; 95% CI: 1.4–5.1). During the analyzed period childbearing women included in this study were not adequately protected against rubella. Anti-rubella vaccination rates were widely unsatisfactory. Being mEPP and reporting allergy were significantly associated to higher rates of VH. Tailored strategies targeting on vaccine safety are needed for retention of these women in immunisation programmes.

Rubella serosurvey and factors related to vaccine hesitancy in childbearing women in Italy

Boattini M.;Bianco G.;Charrier L.;IANNACCONE, MARCO;Masuelli G.;Coggiola M.;SACCHI, ANNA;Cavallo R.
Last
2019

Abstract

Voluntary termination of pregnancy (VTP), pre-conception and post-partum phases, as well as Occupational Medicine consultation for healthcare workers are opportunities for screening and vaccinating rubella seronegative childbearing women. However, data about vaccination acceptance following these phases is rarely reported. A retrospective study over a 2-year period (2016–2017) was performed, evaluating the prevalence of rubella seronegative women which underwent VTP (wVTP), mothers in early puerperal phase (mEPP) and childbearing healthcare workers (CbHW) aged 15–49 years. Anti-rubella vaccination rates and factors associated with vaccine hesitancy (VH) were investigated. Anti-rubella IgG titres were assessed in 8623 women. Seroprevalence of rubella susceptibility was 7.9% (wVTP 6.4%; mEPP 17.4%; CbHW 9.3%). Anti-rubella vaccination rates were found to be different in the three groups (wVTP 37.1%; mEPP 10.9%; CbHW 25.4%), specifically in 2016 and among women born in Italy. VH rate was higher in 2017, especially among wVTP and CbHW. Anti-rubella vaccination rates in wVTP vs. mEPP was higher in women born in Italy but not in those born abroad. Multivariable analyses demonstrated significantly higher risk of VH for mEPP (OR 8.2; 95% CI: 3.9–16.9) and women reporting history of allergy to drugs, food or environmental agents (OR 2.7; 95% CI: 1.4–5.1). During the analyzed period childbearing women included in this study were not adequately protected against rubella. Anti-rubella vaccination rates were widely unsatisfactory. Being mEPP and reporting allergy were significantly associated to higher rates of VH. Tailored strategies targeting on vaccine safety are needed for retention of these women in immunisation programmes.
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https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211335519301196
Congenital rubella syndrome; Rubella; Vaccination
Boattini M.; Bianco G.; Charrier L.; Iannaccone M.; Masuelli G.; Coggiola M.; Sacchi A.; Pittaluga F.; Cavallo R.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1707484
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