Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related syndrome of variable severity, classically characterized by acute kidney involvement, with hypertension and/or proteinuria and reduced kidney function. Once considered a self-limited disease healed by delivery, it is now acknowledged that preeclampsia can affect cardiovascular and kidney health in the long term. The entity of risk has not been established and consequently follow-up policies have not been defined. Here we undertook a systematic review to gain better insights into the need for post–preeclampsia follow-up. Articles published between January 2000 and March 2018 were selected, dealing with at least 20 preeclampsia patients, with follow-up of 4 years or more (MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Library). No quality selection or language restriction was performed. Of the 10,510 titles and abstracts originally considered, 21 papers were selected, providing information on 110,803 cases with and 2,680,929 controls without preeclampsia, with partial overlap between studies on the same databases. Heterogeneity was high, and a random meta-analytic model selected. The increase in risk of end stage renal disease after preeclampsia was significant (meta-analytic risk ratios (95% confidence interval) 6.35 (2.73-14.79)); the risk of albuminuria and chronic kidney disease increased but statistical significance was not reached (4.31 (0.95-19.58) and 2.03 (0.58-7.32), respectively). Translating meta-analytic risk into the number of patients who need follow-up to detect one adverse event, 310 patients with preeclampsia are needed to identify one woman with end stage renal disease or four to identify one woman with albuminuria. Heterogeneity in definitions, insufficient follow-up and incomplete recruitment may account for discrepancies. Thus, preeclampsia significantly increases the risk of end stage renal disease. However, there is lack of sufficient data to show a relationship between preeclampsia, albuminuria and chronic kidney disease, underlining the need for further prospective studies.

A systematic review and meta-analysis indicates long-term risk of chronic and end-stage kidney disease after preeclampsia.

Attini R;Versino E;Piccoli GB
Last
2019

Abstract

Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related syndrome of variable severity, classically characterized by acute kidney involvement, with hypertension and/or proteinuria and reduced kidney function. Once considered a self-limited disease healed by delivery, it is now acknowledged that preeclampsia can affect cardiovascular and kidney health in the long term. The entity of risk has not been established and consequently follow-up policies have not been defined. Here we undertook a systematic review to gain better insights into the need for post–preeclampsia follow-up. Articles published between January 2000 and March 2018 were selected, dealing with at least 20 preeclampsia patients, with follow-up of 4 years or more (MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Library). No quality selection or language restriction was performed. Of the 10,510 titles and abstracts originally considered, 21 papers were selected, providing information on 110,803 cases with and 2,680,929 controls without preeclampsia, with partial overlap between studies on the same databases. Heterogeneity was high, and a random meta-analytic model selected. The increase in risk of end stage renal disease after preeclampsia was significant (meta-analytic risk ratios (95% confidence interval) 6.35 (2.73-14.79)); the risk of albuminuria and chronic kidney disease increased but statistical significance was not reached (4.31 (0.95-19.58) and 2.03 (0.58-7.32), respectively). Translating meta-analytic risk into the number of patients who need follow-up to detect one adverse event, 310 patients with preeclampsia are needed to identify one woman with end stage renal disease or four to identify one woman with albuminuria. Heterogeneity in definitions, insufficient follow-up and incomplete recruitment may account for discrepancies. Thus, preeclampsia significantly increases the risk of end stage renal disease. However, there is lack of sufficient data to show a relationship between preeclampsia, albuminuria and chronic kidney disease, underlining the need for further prospective studies.
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727
albuminuria; chronic kidney disease; dialysis; eGFR; hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; preeclampsia; rapid review; systematic review
Covella B; Vinturache AE Cabiddu G; Attini R; Gesualdo L; Versino E; Piccoli GB
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1714161
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