Despite the significant progress in tumor prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment made over recent decades, cancer is still an enormous public health challenge all around the world, with the number of people affected increasing every year. A great deal of effort is therefore being devoted to the search for novel safe, effective and economically sustainable treatments for the growing population of neoplastic patients. One main obstacle to this process is the extremely low percentage of therapeutic approaches that, after successfully passing pre-clinical testing, actually demonstrate activity when finally tested in humans. This disappointing and expensive failure rate is partly due to the pre-clinical murine models used for in vivo testing, which cannot faithfully recapitulate the multifaceted nature and evolution of human malignancies. These features are better mirrored in natural disease models, i.e., companion animals affected by cancers. Herein, we discuss the relevance of spontaneous canine tumors for the evaluation of the safety and anti-tumor activity of novel therapeutic strategies before in-human trials, and present our experience in the development of a vaccine that targets chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG)4 as an example of these comparative oncology studies.

Naturally occurring cancers in pet dogs as pre-clinical models for cancer immunotherapy

Tarone L.;Barutello G.;Iussich S.;Giacobino D.;Quaglino E.;Buracco P.;Cavallo F.
;
Riccardo F.
2019-01-01

Abstract

Despite the significant progress in tumor prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment made over recent decades, cancer is still an enormous public health challenge all around the world, with the number of people affected increasing every year. A great deal of effort is therefore being devoted to the search for novel safe, effective and economically sustainable treatments for the growing population of neoplastic patients. One main obstacle to this process is the extremely low percentage of therapeutic approaches that, after successfully passing pre-clinical testing, actually demonstrate activity when finally tested in humans. This disappointing and expensive failure rate is partly due to the pre-clinical murine models used for in vivo testing, which cannot faithfully recapitulate the multifaceted nature and evolution of human malignancies. These features are better mirrored in natural disease models, i.e., companion animals affected by cancers. Herein, we discuss the relevance of spontaneous canine tumors for the evaluation of the safety and anti-tumor activity of novel therapeutic strategies before in-human trials, and present our experience in the development of a vaccine that targets chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG)4 as an example of these comparative oncology studies.
2019
68
11
1839
1853
link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00262/index.htm
Comparative oncology; CSPG4; DNA vaccination; Melanoma; Osteosarcoma; PIVAC 18; Animals; Disease Models, Animal; Dog Diseases; Dogs; Humans; Immunotherapy; Neoplasms
Tarone L.; Barutello G.; Iussich S.; Giacobino D.; Quaglino E.; Buracco P.; Cavallo F.; Riccardo F.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1729218
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