Background: Subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) effects may decrease with Parkinson’s disease (PD) progression. There is no indication if, when, and how to consider the interruption of DBS treatment in late-stage PD. The objective of the current study was to investigate the percentage of “poor stimulation responders” among late-stage PD patients for elaborating an algorithm to decide whether and when DBS discontinuation may be considered. Methods: Late-stage PD patients (Hoehn Yahr stage ≥4 and Schwab and England Scale <50 in medication on/stimulation on condition) treated with STN-DBS for at least 5 years underwent a crossover, double-blind, randomized evaluation of acute effects of stimulation. Physicians, caregivers, and patients were blinded to stimulation conditions. Poor stimulation responders (MDS-UPDRS part III change <10% between stimulation on/medication off and stimulation off/medication off) maintained the stimulation off/medication on condition for 1 month for open-label assessment. Results: Thirty-six patients were included. The acute effect of stimulation was significant (17% MDS-UPDRS part III), with 80% of patients classified as “good responders.” Seven patients were classified as “poor stimulation responders,” and the stimulation was switched off, but in 4 cases the stimulation was switched back “on” because of worsening of parkinsonism and dysphagia with a variable time delay (up to 10 days). No serious adverse effects occurred. Conclusions: The vast majority of late-stage PD patients (92%) show a meaningful response to STN-DBS. Effects of stimulation may take days to disappear after its discontinuation. We present a safe and effective decisional algorithm that could guide physicians and caregivers in making challenging therapeutic decisions in late-stage PD. © 2020 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

Should We Consider Deep Brain Stimulation Discontinuation in Late-Stage Parkinson’s Disease?

Fabbri M.;Zibetti M.;Rizzone M. G.;Modugno N.;Piano C.;Romagnolo A.;Artusi C. A.;Berchialla P.;Montanaro E.;Cortelli P.;Lopiano L.
2020

Abstract

Background: Subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) effects may decrease with Parkinson’s disease (PD) progression. There is no indication if, when, and how to consider the interruption of DBS treatment in late-stage PD. The objective of the current study was to investigate the percentage of “poor stimulation responders” among late-stage PD patients for elaborating an algorithm to decide whether and when DBS discontinuation may be considered. Methods: Late-stage PD patients (Hoehn Yahr stage ≥4 and Schwab and England Scale <50 in medication on/stimulation on condition) treated with STN-DBS for at least 5 years underwent a crossover, double-blind, randomized evaluation of acute effects of stimulation. Physicians, caregivers, and patients were blinded to stimulation conditions. Poor stimulation responders (MDS-UPDRS part III change <10% between stimulation on/medication off and stimulation off/medication off) maintained the stimulation off/medication on condition for 1 month for open-label assessment. Results: Thirty-six patients were included. The acute effect of stimulation was significant (17% MDS-UPDRS part III), with 80% of patients classified as “good responders.” Seven patients were classified as “poor stimulation responders,” and the stimulation was switched off, but in 4 cases the stimulation was switched back “on” because of worsening of parkinsonism and dysphagia with a variable time delay (up to 10 days). No serious adverse effects occurred. Conclusions: The vast majority of late-stage PD patients (92%) show a meaningful response to STN-DBS. Effects of stimulation may take days to disappear after its discontinuation. We present a safe and effective decisional algorithm that could guide physicians and caregivers in making challenging therapeutic decisions in late-stage PD. © 2020 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
Online ahead of print
Online ahead of print
caregivers; deep brain stimulation; dementia; late stage; Parkinson’s disease
Fabbri M.; Zibetti M.; Rizzone M.G.; Giannini G.; Borellini L.; Stefani A.; Bove F.; Bruno A.; Calandra-Buonaura G.; Modugno N.; Piano C.; Peppe A.; Ardolino G.; Romagnolo A.; Artusi C.A.; Berchialla P.; Montanaro E.; Cortelli P.; Luigi R.; Eleopra R.; Minafra B.; Pacchetti C.; Tufo T.; Cogiamanian F.; Lopiano L.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1740995
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 3
  • Scopus 6
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 5
social impact