BACKGROUNDGynecological malignancies represent a major cause of death in women and are often treated with platinum-based regimens. Patients undergoing chemotherapy suffer from alterations in nutritional status which may worsen gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities, quality of life and affect the overall prognosis. Indeed, assuring a good nutritional status and limiting toxicities during treatment are still major goals for clinicians.AIMTo assess the role of Mediterranean Diet (MD) in reducing GI toxicities in patients with gynecological cancers treated with platinum-based regimens.METHODSWe conducted an observational study on 22 patients with gynecological tumors treated with a platinum-based chemotherapy at Candiolo Cancer Institute FPO/IRCCS between January 2018 and June 2018. The food and frequency (FFQ) and the Patient-Reported Outcomes Common Terminology Criteria For Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE) questionnaires were administered at baseline and at every Day 1 of each cycle. To evaluate the differences in GI toxicities the study population was divided in two groups according to the currently validated Mediterranean Diet Serving Score (MDSS) at baseline.RESULTSPatients with high MDSS reported a trend toward lower GI toxicities according to PRO-CTCAE at each timepoint (first evaluation: P = 0.7; second: P = 0.52; third: P = 0.01). In particular, difference in nausea frequency and gravity (P < 0.001), stomach pain frequency and gravity (P = 0.01 and P = 0.02), abdomen bloating frequency and gravity (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03), and interference with daily activities (P = 0.02) were highly statistically significant at the end of treatment. More than 60% of patients changed their food habits during chemotherapy mainly because of GI toxicities. A higher reduction of food intake, both in terms of caloric (P = 0.29) and of single nutrients emerged in the group experiencing higher toxicity.CONCLUSIONOur results show that adherence to MD possibly reduces GI toxicity and prevents nutritional status impairment during chemotherapy treatment. Bigger studies are needed to confirm our results.

Role of Mediterranean diet in preventing platinum based gastrointestinal toxicity in gynecolocological malignancies: A single Institution experience

Ghisoni, E;Giannone, G;Mittica, G;Tuninetti, V;Valabrega, G
2019

Abstract

BACKGROUNDGynecological malignancies represent a major cause of death in women and are often treated with platinum-based regimens. Patients undergoing chemotherapy suffer from alterations in nutritional status which may worsen gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities, quality of life and affect the overall prognosis. Indeed, assuring a good nutritional status and limiting toxicities during treatment are still major goals for clinicians.AIMTo assess the role of Mediterranean Diet (MD) in reducing GI toxicities in patients with gynecological cancers treated with platinum-based regimens.METHODSWe conducted an observational study on 22 patients with gynecological tumors treated with a platinum-based chemotherapy at Candiolo Cancer Institute FPO/IRCCS between January 2018 and June 2018. The food and frequency (FFQ) and the Patient-Reported Outcomes Common Terminology Criteria For Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE) questionnaires were administered at baseline and at every Day 1 of each cycle. To evaluate the differences in GI toxicities the study population was divided in two groups according to the currently validated Mediterranean Diet Serving Score (MDSS) at baseline.RESULTSPatients with high MDSS reported a trend toward lower GI toxicities according to PRO-CTCAE at each timepoint (first evaluation: P = 0.7; second: P = 0.52; third: P = 0.01). In particular, difference in nausea frequency and gravity (P < 0.001), stomach pain frequency and gravity (P = 0.01 and P = 0.02), abdomen bloating frequency and gravity (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03), and interference with daily activities (P = 0.02) were highly statistically significant at the end of treatment. More than 60% of patients changed their food habits during chemotherapy mainly because of GI toxicities. A higher reduction of food intake, both in terms of caloric (P = 0.29) and of single nutrients emerged in the group experiencing higher toxicity.CONCLUSIONOur results show that adherence to MD possibly reduces GI toxicity and prevents nutritional status impairment during chemotherapy treatment. Bigger studies are needed to confirm our results.
10
12
391-401
401
Mediterranean diet; Gynecological malignancies; Gastrointestinal toxicities; Platinum-based chemotherapy; Nutritional status
Ghisoni, E; Casalone, V; Giannone, G; Mittica, G; Tuninetti, V; Valabrega, G
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1742199
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