Near-surface sharp lateral variations can be either a target of investigation or an issue for the reconstruction of reliable subsurface models in surface-wave (SW) prospecting. Effective and computationally fast methods are consequently required for detection and location of these shallow heterogeneities. Four SW-based techniques, chosen between available literature methods, are tested for detection and location purposes. All of the techniques are updated for multifold data and then systematically applied on new synthetic and field data. The selected methods are based on computation of the energy, energy decay exponent, attenuation coefficient, and autospectrum. The multifold upgrade is based on the stacking of the computed parameters for single-shot or single-offset records and improves readability and interpretation of the final results. Detection and location capabilities are extensively evaluated on a variety of 2D synthetic models, simulating different target geometries, embedment conditions, and impedance contrasts with respect to the background. The methods are then validated on two field cases: a shallow low-velocity body in a sedimentary sequence and a hard-rock site with two embedded subvertical open fractures. For a quantitative comparison, the horizontal gradients of the four parameters are analyzed to establish uniform criteria for location estimation. All of the methods indicate ability in detecting and locating lateral variations having lower acoustic impedance than the surrounding material, with errors generally comparable or lower than the geophone spacing. More difficulties are encountered in locating targets with higher acoustic impedance than the background, especially in the presence of weak lateral contrasts, high embedment depths, and small dimensions of the object.

Imaging near-surface sharp lateral variations with surface-wave methods - Part 1: Detection and location

Colombero C.;Comina C.;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Near-surface sharp lateral variations can be either a target of investigation or an issue for the reconstruction of reliable subsurface models in surface-wave (SW) prospecting. Effective and computationally fast methods are consequently required for detection and location of these shallow heterogeneities. Four SW-based techniques, chosen between available literature methods, are tested for detection and location purposes. All of the techniques are updated for multifold data and then systematically applied on new synthetic and field data. The selected methods are based on computation of the energy, energy decay exponent, attenuation coefficient, and autospectrum. The multifold upgrade is based on the stacking of the computed parameters for single-shot or single-offset records and improves readability and interpretation of the final results. Detection and location capabilities are extensively evaluated on a variety of 2D synthetic models, simulating different target geometries, embedment conditions, and impedance contrasts with respect to the background. The methods are then validated on two field cases: a shallow low-velocity body in a sedimentary sequence and a hard-rock site with two embedded subvertical open fractures. For a quantitative comparison, the horizontal gradients of the four parameters are analyzed to establish uniform criteria for location estimation. All of the methods indicate ability in detecting and locating lateral variations having lower acoustic impedance than the surrounding material, with errors generally comparable or lower than the geophone spacing. More difficulties are encountered in locating targets with higher acoustic impedance than the background, especially in the presence of weak lateral contrasts, high embedment depths, and small dimensions of the object.
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Colombero C.; Comina C.; Socco L.V.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1754862
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