A significant part of mélanges recognized in exhumed convergent margins around the world has been recently documented to have chiefly originated from masse transport and subsurface remobilization and disruption (i.e. mélanges, from sedimentary and mud–serpentinite diapiric processes and from in situ fluidification–disruption). Tectonic and/or sedimentary processes occurring during subsequent multiple deformational events of convergent margin evolution commonly overprint and significantly rework the primary (sedimentary or diapiric) mélange fabric, forming polygenetic mélanges. This ultimately complicates their distinction from true tectonic mélanges, masking part of the recorded tectono-sedimentary evolution of the associated convergent margin. The contributions gathered in this thematic collection explore with different approaches (from field structural and stratigraphic observations to geophysical analyses) different types of polygenetic mélange, at various scales, around the world. These studies conclude that the understanding of this type of mélange may provide crucial insights for a more detailed interpretation of the evolution of ancient and modern convergent margins, and of processes and mechanisms triggering potential natural hazards (earthquakes and tsunamis). Case studies include the Apennines in the Central Mediterranean region, the Carpathians in Central Europe and the Nankai Prism in Japan.

Polygenetic mélanges: A glimpse on tectonic, sedimentary and diapiric recycling in convergent margins

Festa A.
First
;
2020-01-01

Abstract

A significant part of mélanges recognized in exhumed convergent margins around the world has been recently documented to have chiefly originated from masse transport and subsurface remobilization and disruption (i.e. mélanges, from sedimentary and mud–serpentinite diapiric processes and from in situ fluidification–disruption). Tectonic and/or sedimentary processes occurring during subsequent multiple deformational events of convergent margin evolution commonly overprint and significantly rework the primary (sedimentary or diapiric) mélange fabric, forming polygenetic mélanges. This ultimately complicates their distinction from true tectonic mélanges, masking part of the recorded tectono-sedimentary evolution of the associated convergent margin. The contributions gathered in this thematic collection explore with different approaches (from field structural and stratigraphic observations to geophysical analyses) different types of polygenetic mélange, at various scales, around the world. These studies conclude that the understanding of this type of mélange may provide crucial insights for a more detailed interpretation of the evolution of ancient and modern convergent margins, and of processes and mechanisms triggering potential natural hazards (earthquakes and tsunamis). Case studies include the Apennines in the Central Mediterranean region, the Carpathians in Central Europe and the Nankai Prism in Japan.
2020
177
3
551
561
Festa A.; Ogata K.; Pini G.A.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1757046
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