We aim to explore the connections between structural network inequalities and bank’s customer spending behaviours, within an entire national ecosystem made of natural persons (i.e., an individual human being) and legal entities (i.e., private or public organisations), different business sectors, and supply chains that span distinct geographical regions. We focus on Italy, that is among the wealthiest nations in the world, and also an example of a complex economic system. In particular, we had access to a large subset of anonymised and GDPR-compliant wire transfer data recorded from Jan 2016 to Dec 2017 by Intesa Sanpaolo, a leading banking group in the Eurozone, and the most important one in Italy.Intesa Sanpaolo wire transfers network exhibits a strong heavy-tailed behaviour and a giant component that grows continuously around the same core of the 1% highest degree nodes, and it also shows a general disassortative pattern, even if some ranges of degrees’ values stand out from the trend. Structural heterogeneity is explored further by means of a bow-tie analysis, that shows clearly that the majority of relevant, in terms of transferred amount, transactions is settled between a smaller set of nodes that are associated to legal entities and that mostly belong to the strongly connected component. This observation brings to a more comprehensive inspection of differences between Italian regions and business sectors, that could support the detection and the understanding of the interplay between supply chains.Our results suggest that there is a general flow of money that seems to stream down from higher degree legal entities to lower degree natural persons, crossing Italian regions and connecting different business sectors, and that is finally redistributed through expenses sharing within families and smaller communities. We also describe a reference dataset and an empirical contribution to the study on financial networks, focusing on finer-grained information concerned about spending behaviour through wire transfers.

Structural inequalities emerging from a large wire transfers network

Semeraro, Alfonso
First
;
Ruffo, Giancarlo
Last
2020

Abstract

We aim to explore the connections between structural network inequalities and bank’s customer spending behaviours, within an entire national ecosystem made of natural persons (i.e., an individual human being) and legal entities (i.e., private or public organisations), different business sectors, and supply chains that span distinct geographical regions. We focus on Italy, that is among the wealthiest nations in the world, and also an example of a complex economic system. In particular, we had access to a large subset of anonymised and GDPR-compliant wire transfer data recorded from Jan 2016 to Dec 2017 by Intesa Sanpaolo, a leading banking group in the Eurozone, and the most important one in Italy.Intesa Sanpaolo wire transfers network exhibits a strong heavy-tailed behaviour and a giant component that grows continuously around the same core of the 1% highest degree nodes, and it also shows a general disassortative pattern, even if some ranges of degrees’ values stand out from the trend. Structural heterogeneity is explored further by means of a bow-tie analysis, that shows clearly that the majority of relevant, in terms of transferred amount, transactions is settled between a smaller set of nodes that are associated to legal entities and that mostly belong to the strongly connected component. This observation brings to a more comprehensive inspection of differences between Italian regions and business sectors, that could support the detection and the understanding of the interplay between supply chains.Our results suggest that there is a general flow of money that seems to stream down from higher degree legal entities to lower degree natural persons, crossing Italian regions and connecting different business sectors, and that is finally redistributed through expenses sharing within families and smaller communities. We also describe a reference dataset and an empirical contribution to the study on financial networks, focusing on finer-grained information concerned about spending behaviour through wire transfers.
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https://appliednetsci.springeropen.com/articles/10.1007/s41109-020-00314-x
Complex networks analysis, Financial networks, Wire transfers, Assortativity, Bow-tie analysis, Spending Behaviour, Supply chains
Semeraro, Alfonso; Tambuscio, Marcella; Ronchiadin, Silvia; Li Puma, Laura; Ruffo, Giancarlo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1758320
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