Background: Preeclampsia (PE) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are linked by an only partially known cause-effect relationship. Knowledge on prevalence of CKD in PE patients is needed for evaluating the diagnostic yield of nephrology work-up after PE. Methods: The study was undertaken in the Centre Hospitalier Le Mans (CHM), setting of tertiary level obstetric service (about 3500 deliveries/year). PE was identified on hospital’s discharge codes; after review, the study included 99 patients, 36 of which were also evaluated in Nephrology. A descriptive analysis was performed as appropriate. Logistic multiple regression tested the outcome “CKD diagnosis”; covariates that emerged as significant were selected; only singletons were included. Analysis was performed in SPSS. The ethics committee of the CHM approved the study. Results: Prevalence of CKD was 14%; CKD was in stage 1 in 8/14 (57%); 5 patients were in stage 2 (36%), 1 in stage 3 (7%). CKD was known or acknowledged in 1 case only. Diagnoses included reflux nephropathy-other malformations (5 cases), kidney stones-chronic pyelonephritis (3), PKD (1), interstitial nephropathy (2), diabetic nephropathy (1), albuminuria in metabolic syndrome (2). At the logistic regression analysis, preterm delivery [OR 7.849 (1.667–36.968)] and a baby normal for gestational age [> 10th centile; OR 6.193 (1.400–27.394)] were significantly correlated with the diagnosis of CKD. Conclusions: Within the limits of a single-center study, our data quantify CKD as common in PE women and suggest the presence of a “CKD phenotype” characterised by preterm delivery and adequate growth, implying that CKD is compatible with good placental function up to the last phase of pregnancy.

Chronic kidney disease in preeclamptic patients: not found unless searched for—Is a nephrology evaluation useful after an episode of preeclampsia?

Biolcati M.;Attini R.;Piccoli G. B.
Last
2019

Abstract

Background: Preeclampsia (PE) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are linked by an only partially known cause-effect relationship. Knowledge on prevalence of CKD in PE patients is needed for evaluating the diagnostic yield of nephrology work-up after PE. Methods: The study was undertaken in the Centre Hospitalier Le Mans (CHM), setting of tertiary level obstetric service (about 3500 deliveries/year). PE was identified on hospital’s discharge codes; after review, the study included 99 patients, 36 of which were also evaluated in Nephrology. A descriptive analysis was performed as appropriate. Logistic multiple regression tested the outcome “CKD diagnosis”; covariates that emerged as significant were selected; only singletons were included. Analysis was performed in SPSS. The ethics committee of the CHM approved the study. Results: Prevalence of CKD was 14%; CKD was in stage 1 in 8/14 (57%); 5 patients were in stage 2 (36%), 1 in stage 3 (7%). CKD was known or acknowledged in 1 case only. Diagnoses included reflux nephropathy-other malformations (5 cases), kidney stones-chronic pyelonephritis (3), PKD (1), interstitial nephropathy (2), diabetic nephropathy (1), albuminuria in metabolic syndrome (2). At the logistic regression analysis, preterm delivery [OR 7.849 (1.667–36.968)] and a baby normal for gestational age [> 10th centile; OR 6.193 (1.400–27.394)] were significantly correlated with the diagnosis of CKD. Conclusions: Within the limits of a single-center study, our data quantify CKD as common in PE women and suggest the presence of a “CKD phenotype” characterised by preterm delivery and adequate growth, implying that CKD is compatible with good placental function up to the last phase of pregnancy.
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https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40620-019-00629-8
Chronic kidney disease; Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; Obesity; Preeclampsia; Risk factors; Adult; Female; France; Gestational Age; Humans; Incidence; Infant, Newborn; Male; Nephrology; Pre-Eclampsia; Pregnancy; Premature Birth; Prevalence; Renal Insufficiency, Chronic; Risk Assessment; Risk Factors
Filali Khattabi Z.; Biolcati M.; Fois A.; Chatrenet A.; Laroche D.; Attini R.; Cheve M.T.; Piccoli G.B.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1771060
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