Green spaces may benefit human health mainly by mitigating noise and air pollution, promoting physical or social activities and improving mental health. Based on the influence that green space exposure seems to exert on Public Health and using a multidisciplinary approach, we investigated, the association between oxidative stress (OS) and green exposure in children. Overall, 207 subjects (10-13 yrs.) living in Torino (NW- Italy) were involved in this study. Each participant provided a urinary sample, used to quantify a reliable OS biomarker (15-F2t-IsoP), and their residence addresses, used for geocoding. Green exposure was characterised by calculating i) the Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI) within fixed buffers around each participant’s home, using remotely-sensed data; ii) Tree Map accounting for evergreen/broadleaf species; iii) The percentage of green cover (PGC). Significant negative correlation (Pearson’s r = -0.758, p < 0.001) between PGC and 15-F2t-IsoP was found. Greater SAVI was associated with lower OS (Pearson’s r = -0.717, p < 0.001). Noticeably, evergreens seemed to determine a significant OS reduction compared to broadleaves (slope = -0.12 and -0.02, respectively; Warton-test F = 12.48, p = 0.0011). Finally, a spatial distribution of 15-F2t-IsoP estimates map, overlying with 2011 Census Data on same-aged dwellers of Torino, was generated. Predictive models accounting for green spaces influence on OS can be useful tool derived from geomatic employ in the Public Health field. Future developments of such a multidisciplinary approach should be considered in urban planning and policy-makers decisions to better define priority zones to requalify in urban settings.

Geomatics and Epidemiology: Associating Oxidative Stress and Greenness in Urban Areas

DE PETRIS SAMUELE;SQUILLACIOTI GIULIA
Co-first
;
BONO ROBERTO
Co-last
;
BORGOGNO-MONDINO ENRICO
2021

Abstract

Green spaces may benefit human health mainly by mitigating noise and air pollution, promoting physical or social activities and improving mental health. Based on the influence that green space exposure seems to exert on Public Health and using a multidisciplinary approach, we investigated, the association between oxidative stress (OS) and green exposure in children. Overall, 207 subjects (10-13 yrs.) living in Torino (NW- Italy) were involved in this study. Each participant provided a urinary sample, used to quantify a reliable OS biomarker (15-F2t-IsoP), and their residence addresses, used for geocoding. Green exposure was characterised by calculating i) the Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI) within fixed buffers around each participant’s home, using remotely-sensed data; ii) Tree Map accounting for evergreen/broadleaf species; iii) The percentage of green cover (PGC). Significant negative correlation (Pearson’s r = -0.758, p < 0.001) between PGC and 15-F2t-IsoP was found. Greater SAVI was associated with lower OS (Pearson’s r = -0.717, p < 0.001). Noticeably, evergreens seemed to determine a significant OS reduction compared to broadleaves (slope = -0.12 and -0.02, respectively; Warton-test F = 12.48, p = 0.0011). Finally, a spatial distribution of 15-F2t-IsoP estimates map, overlying with 2011 Census Data on same-aged dwellers of Torino, was generated. Predictive models accounting for green spaces influence on OS can be useful tool derived from geomatic employ in the Public Health field. Future developments of such a multidisciplinary approach should be considered in urban planning and policy-makers decisions to better define priority zones to requalify in urban settings.
197
1
11
Urban Vegetation, Remote Sensing, Public Health, Isoprostane
DE PETRIS SAMUELE, SQUILLACIOTI GIULIA, BONO ROBERTO, BORGOGNO-MONDINO ENRICO
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1781336
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