Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, an ATP-gated chloride channel expressed on the apical surface of airway epithelial cells. CFTR absence/dysfunction results in defective ion transport and subsequent airway surface liquid dehydration that severely compromise the airway microenvironment. Noxious agents and pathogens are entrapped inside the abnormally thick mucus layer and establish a highly inflammatory environment, ultimately leading to lung damage. Since chronic airway inflammation plays a crucial role in CF pathophysiology, several studies have investigated the mechanisms responsible for the altered inflammatory/immune response that, in turn, exacerbates the epithelial dysfunction and infection susceptibility in CF patients. In this review, we address the evidence for a critical role of dysfunctional inflammation in lung damage in CF and discuss current therapeutic approaches targeting this condition, as well as potential new treatments that have been developed recently. Traditional therapeutic strategies have shown several limitations and limited clinical benefits. Therefore, many efforts have been made to develop alternative treatments and novel therapeutic approaches, and recent findings have identified new molecules as potential anti-inflammatory agents that may exert beneficial effects in CF patients. Furthermore, the potential anti-inflammatory properties of CFTR modulators, a class of drugs that directly target the molecular defect of CF, also will be critically reviewed. Finally, we also will discuss the possible impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on CF patients, with a major focus on the consequences that the viral infection could have on the persistent inflammation in these patients.

Dysfunctional inflammation in cystic fibrosis airways: From mechanisms to novel therapeutic approaches

Ghigo A.;Prono G.;Riccardi E.;De Rose V.
2021

Abstract

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, an ATP-gated chloride channel expressed on the apical surface of airway epithelial cells. CFTR absence/dysfunction results in defective ion transport and subsequent airway surface liquid dehydration that severely compromise the airway microenvironment. Noxious agents and pathogens are entrapped inside the abnormally thick mucus layer and establish a highly inflammatory environment, ultimately leading to lung damage. Since chronic airway inflammation plays a crucial role in CF pathophysiology, several studies have investigated the mechanisms responsible for the altered inflammatory/immune response that, in turn, exacerbates the epithelial dysfunction and infection susceptibility in CF patients. In this review, we address the evidence for a critical role of dysfunctional inflammation in lung damage in CF and discuss current therapeutic approaches targeting this condition, as well as potential new treatments that have been developed recently. Traditional therapeutic strategies have shown several limitations and limited clinical benefits. Therefore, many efforts have been made to develop alternative treatments and novel therapeutic approaches, and recent findings have identified new molecules as potential anti-inflammatory agents that may exert beneficial effects in CF patients. Furthermore, the potential anti-inflammatory properties of CFTR modulators, a class of drugs that directly target the molecular defect of CF, also will be critically reviewed. Finally, we also will discuss the possible impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on CF patients, with a major focus on the consequences that the viral infection could have on the persistent inflammation in these patients.
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Anti-inflammatory treatment; CFTR modulators; Cystic fibrosis; Inflammation; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Anti-Inflammatory Agents; Azithromycin; COVID-19; Cannabinoids; Cystic Fibrosis; Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator; Eicosanoids; Humans; Inflammation; Protein Kinase Inhibitors; Roscovitine; Signal Transduction; Thymalfasin
Ghigo A.; Prono G.; Riccardi E.; De Rose V.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1790795
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