Animal communication has long been thought to be subject to pressures and constraints associated with social relationships. However, our understanding of how the nature and quality of social relationships relate to the use and evolution of communication is limited by a lack of directly comparable methods across multiple levels of analysis. Here, we analyzed observational data from 111 wild groups belonging to 26 non-human primate species, to test how vocal communication relates to dominance style (the strictness with which a dominance hierarchy is enforced, ranging from ‘despotic’ to ‘tolerant’). At the individual level, we found that dominant individuals who were more tolerant vocalized at a higher rate than their despotic counterparts. This indicates that tolerance within a relationship may place pressure on the dominant partner to communicate more during social interactions. At the species level, however, despotic species exhibited a larger repertoire of hierarchy-related vocalizations than their tolerant counterparts. Findings suggest primate signals are used and evolve in tandem with the nature of interactions that characterize individuals’ social relationships.

Dominance style is a key predictor of vocal use and evolution across nonhuman primates

Gamba, Marco;Giacoma, Cristina;Torti, Valeria;Valente, Daria;Zanoli, Anna;
2021

Abstract

Animal communication has long been thought to be subject to pressures and constraints associated with social relationships. However, our understanding of how the nature and quality of social relationships relate to the use and evolution of communication is limited by a lack of directly comparable methods across multiple levels of analysis. Here, we analyzed observational data from 111 wild groups belonging to 26 non-human primate species, to test how vocal communication relates to dominance style (the strictness with which a dominance hierarchy is enforced, ranging from ‘despotic’ to ‘tolerant’). At the individual level, we found that dominant individuals who were more tolerant vocalized at a higher rate than their despotic counterparts. This indicates that tolerance within a relationship may place pressure on the dominant partner to communicate more during social interactions. At the species level, however, despotic species exhibited a larger repertoire of hierarchy-related vocalizations than their tolerant counterparts. Findings suggest primate signals are used and evolve in tandem with the nature of interactions that characterize individuals’ social relationships.
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210873
210887
https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/pdf/10.1098/rsos.210873
communication, sociality, social behaviour, dominance style, vocal
Kavanagh, Eithne; Street, Sally E.; Angwela, Felix O.; Bergman, Thore J.; Blaszczyk, Maryjka B.; Bolt, Laura M.; Briseño-Jaramillo, Margarita; Brown, Michelle; Chen-Kraus, Chloe; Clay, Zanna; Coye, Camille; Thompson, Melissa Emery; Estrada, Alejandro; Fichtel, Claudia; Fruth, Barbara; Gamba, Marco; Giacoma, Cristina; Graham, Kirsty E.; Green, Samantha; Grueter, Cyril C.; Gupta, Shreejata; Gustison, Morgan L.; Hagberg, Lindsey; Hedwig, Daniela; Jack, Katharine M.; Kappeler, Peter M.; King-Bailey, Gillian; Kuběnová, Barbora; Lemasson, Alban; Inglis, David MacGregor; Machanda, Zarin; MacIntosh, Andrew; Majolo, Bonaventura; Marshall, Sophie; Mercier, Stephanie; Micheletta, Jérôme; Muller, Martin; Notman, Hugh; Ouattara, Karim; Ostner, Julia; Pavelka, Mary S. M.; Peckre, Louise R.; Petersdorf, Megan; Quintero, Fredy; Ramos-Fernández, Gabriel; Robbins, Martha M.; Salmi, Roberta; Schamberg, Isaac; Schülke, Oliver; Semple, Stuart; Silk, Joan B.; Sosa-Lopéz, J. Roberto; Torti, Valeria; Valente, Daria; Ventura, Raffaella; van de Waal, Erica; Weyher, Anna H.; Wilke, Claudia; Wrangham, Richard; Young, Christopher; Zanoli, Anna; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Lameira, Adriano R.; Slocombe, Katie
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1795275
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