Background: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is increasingly recognized as a multidimensional disorder, characterized by several non-motor symptoms, including disturbances of sleep and cognition. Current studies on the relationship between sleep problems and neuropsychological functions, mainly conducted in early to moderate PD patients, outline mixed results. In this study, we analysed the relationship between subjectively reported sleep alterations and cognitive functions in a large cohort of 181 advanced PD patients. Methods: All consecutive, non-demented, advanced PD patients candidates for device-aided therapy completed two self-administered sleep questionnaires—the Parkinson’s Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS-2) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS)—and underwent a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests encompassing five cognitive domains (reasoning, memory, attention, frontal executive functions, and language). Results: Patients showed mild to moderate sleep problems (PDSS-2 score: 23.4 ± 1.2) and mild daytime sleepiness (ESS 8.6 ± 5.1). A significant correlation was found between PDSS-2 total score and non-verbal reasoning, as well as attentive skills, executive functions, and language abilities. No correlations were found between sleep measures and memory tests scores. Patients with clinically relevant sleep disturbances performed worse on attention, executive functions, and language. No significant correlations were found between daytime sleepiness and any neuropsychological test. Conclusions: In advanced PD patients, sleep disturbances selectively correlate with specific neuropsychological functions and not with short-term memory and consolidation. Even if confirmations by means of longitudinal studies are needed, our observations suggest the importance of considering treatment of sleep disturbances to minimize their potential impact on cognition.

Association between sleep disorders and cognitive dysfunctions in non-demented patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease

Montanaro E.
Co-first
;
Romagnolo A.
Co-first
;
Fabbri M.;Artusi C. A.;Imbalzano G.;Rizzone M. G.;Lopiano L.;Zibetti M.
2021

Abstract

Background: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is increasingly recognized as a multidimensional disorder, characterized by several non-motor symptoms, including disturbances of sleep and cognition. Current studies on the relationship between sleep problems and neuropsychological functions, mainly conducted in early to moderate PD patients, outline mixed results. In this study, we analysed the relationship between subjectively reported sleep alterations and cognitive functions in a large cohort of 181 advanced PD patients. Methods: All consecutive, non-demented, advanced PD patients candidates for device-aided therapy completed two self-administered sleep questionnaires—the Parkinson’s Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS-2) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS)—and underwent a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests encompassing five cognitive domains (reasoning, memory, attention, frontal executive functions, and language). Results: Patients showed mild to moderate sleep problems (PDSS-2 score: 23.4 ± 1.2) and mild daytime sleepiness (ESS 8.6 ± 5.1). A significant correlation was found between PDSS-2 total score and non-verbal reasoning, as well as attentive skills, executive functions, and language abilities. No correlations were found between sleep measures and memory tests scores. Patients with clinically relevant sleep disturbances performed worse on attention, executive functions, and language. No significant correlations were found between daytime sleepiness and any neuropsychological test. Conclusions: In advanced PD patients, sleep disturbances selectively correlate with specific neuropsychological functions and not with short-term memory and consolidation. Even if confirmations by means of longitudinal studies are needed, our observations suggest the importance of considering treatment of sleep disturbances to minimize their potential impact on cognition.
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Cognitive impairment; Non-motor symptoms; Parkinson’s disease; Sleep disorders
Montanaro E.; Romagnolo A.; Fabbri M.; Artusi C.A.; Imbalzano G.; Rizzone M.G.; Lopiano L.; Zibetti M.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1797090
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