Sarcoptic mange is a cosmopolitan disease affecting the skin of domestic and wild mammalian species and humans as well. In Eurasia, sarcoptidosis (also known as sarcoptic mange or scabies) affects mountain ungulates (Caprinae) among other wild hosts, and epizootic outbreaks induce variable mortality rates. This fact, coupled with the important ecological and socio-economic values of such mammalian hosts, resulted in many research projects being focused on addressing ecological, physiological, behavioural, genetic, and pathological effects of the disease. Nevertheless, information about management of sarcoptic mange in free-ranging populations is scarce and scattered, with contradictory results and a lack of consensus on basic aspects of the disease. In this review, we summarise knowledge on the effects of sarcoptic mange in wild Caprinae, at individual, pathological and population epidemiological levels, as well as on the current tools and management strategies for its detection, diagnosis, prevention, and control. Disease spread in naïve populations is ca. 6 km year−1, and the mortality rate can be >95%. Tools for monitoring the disease include visual diagnosis, photographic traps, trained dogs, thermography, immunodiagnostics, molecular tools, radiocollars, and epidemiological modelling. Options for management include eradication, control, and prevention of the disease; biosecurity and prevention of spread to humans can be achieved by careful hygiene methods. Sarcoptic mange is a natural, biological factor controlling host population numbers and dynamics in Caprinae, so goals and strategies for its management in wild populations must be set accordingly. Specific management programmes for preventing and controlling sarcoptic mange in wild Caprinae populations must be based on reliable epidemiological data. More research is needed to provide evidence-based policies. The efficacy and safety of various management approaches remain to be tested experimentally.

Biology and management of sarcoptic mange in wild Caprinae populations

Rossi L.;Meneguz P. G.;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Sarcoptic mange is a cosmopolitan disease affecting the skin of domestic and wild mammalian species and humans as well. In Eurasia, sarcoptidosis (also known as sarcoptic mange or scabies) affects mountain ungulates (Caprinae) among other wild hosts, and epizootic outbreaks induce variable mortality rates. This fact, coupled with the important ecological and socio-economic values of such mammalian hosts, resulted in many research projects being focused on addressing ecological, physiological, behavioural, genetic, and pathological effects of the disease. Nevertheless, information about management of sarcoptic mange in free-ranging populations is scarce and scattered, with contradictory results and a lack of consensus on basic aspects of the disease. In this review, we summarise knowledge on the effects of sarcoptic mange in wild Caprinae, at individual, pathological and population epidemiological levels, as well as on the current tools and management strategies for its detection, diagnosis, prevention, and control. Disease spread in naïve populations is ca. 6 km year−1, and the mortality rate can be >95%. Tools for monitoring the disease include visual diagnosis, photographic traps, trained dogs, thermography, immunodiagnostics, molecular tools, radiocollars, and epidemiological modelling. Options for management include eradication, control, and prevention of the disease; biosecurity and prevention of spread to humans can be achieved by careful hygiene methods. Sarcoptic mange is a natural, biological factor controlling host population numbers and dynamics in Caprinae, so goals and strategies for its management in wild populations must be set accordingly. Specific management programmes for preventing and controlling sarcoptic mange in wild Caprinae populations must be based on reliable epidemiological data. More research is needed to provide evidence-based policies. The efficacy and safety of various management approaches remain to be tested experimentally.
2021
51
1
82
94
disease control; disease management; epidemic monitoring; Eurasia; modelling; sarcoptic mange; wild Caprinae
Perez J.M.; Granados J.E.; Espinosa J.; Raez-Bravo A.; Lopez-Olvera J.R.; Rossi L.; Meneguz P.G.; Angelone S.; Fandos P.; Soriguer R.C.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1805956
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