Background. The real impact of septic shock-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) on the long-term renal outcome is still debated, and little is known about AKI-burn patients. In a cohort of burn survivors treated by continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) and sorbent technology (CPFA-CRRT), we investigated the long-term outcome of glomerular and tubular function. Methods. Out of 211 burn patients undergoing CRRT from 2001 to 2017, 45 survived, 40 completed the clinical follow-up (cumulative observation period 4067 months, median 84 months, IR 44-173), and 30 were alive on 31 December 2020. Besides creatinine and urine albumin, in the 19 patients treated with CPFA-CRRT, we determined the normalized GFR by 99mTc-DTPA (NRI-GFR) and studied glomerular and tubular urine protein markers. Results. At the follow-up endpoint, the median plasma creatinine and urine albumin were 0.99 (0.72–1.19) and 0.0 mg/dL (0.0–0.0), respectively. NRI-GFR was 103.0 mL/min (93.4–115). Four patients were diabetic, and 22/30 presented at least one risk factor for chronic disease (hypertension, dyslipidemia, and overweight). Proteinuria decreased over time, from 0.47 g/day (0.42–0.52) at 6 months to 0.134 g/day (0.09–0.17) at follow-up endpoint. Proteinuria positively correlated with the peak of plasma creatinine (r 0.6953, p 0.006) and the number of CRRT days (r 0.5650, p 0.035) during AKI course, and negatively with NRI–GFR (r −0.5545, p 0.049). In seven patients, urine protein profile showed a significant increase of glomerular marker albumin and glomerular/tubular index. Conclusions. Burn patients who experienced septic shock and AKI treated with CRRT had a long-term expectation of preserved renal function. However, these patients were more predisposed to microalbuminuria, diabetes, and the presence of risk factors for intercurrent comorbidities and chronic renal disease.

Long-term preservation of renal function in septic shock burn patients requiring renal replacement therapy for acute kidney injury

Mariano F.;De Biase C.;Deambrosis I.;Mella A.;Rumbolo F.;Biancone L.
2021

Abstract

Background. The real impact of septic shock-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) on the long-term renal outcome is still debated, and little is known about AKI-burn patients. In a cohort of burn survivors treated by continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) and sorbent technology (CPFA-CRRT), we investigated the long-term outcome of glomerular and tubular function. Methods. Out of 211 burn patients undergoing CRRT from 2001 to 2017, 45 survived, 40 completed the clinical follow-up (cumulative observation period 4067 months, median 84 months, IR 44-173), and 30 were alive on 31 December 2020. Besides creatinine and urine albumin, in the 19 patients treated with CPFA-CRRT, we determined the normalized GFR by 99mTc-DTPA (NRI-GFR) and studied glomerular and tubular urine protein markers. Results. At the follow-up endpoint, the median plasma creatinine and urine albumin were 0.99 (0.72–1.19) and 0.0 mg/dL (0.0–0.0), respectively. NRI-GFR was 103.0 mL/min (93.4–115). Four patients were diabetic, and 22/30 presented at least one risk factor for chronic disease (hypertension, dyslipidemia, and overweight). Proteinuria decreased over time, from 0.47 g/day (0.42–0.52) at 6 months to 0.134 g/day (0.09–0.17) at follow-up endpoint. Proteinuria positively correlated with the peak of plasma creatinine (r 0.6953, p 0.006) and the number of CRRT days (r 0.5650, p 0.035) during AKI course, and negatively with NRI–GFR (r −0.5545, p 0.049). In seven patients, urine protein profile showed a significant increase of glomerular marker albumin and glomerular/tubular index. Conclusions. Burn patients who experienced septic shock and AKI treated with CRRT had a long-term expectation of preserved renal function. However, these patients were more predisposed to microalbuminuria, diabetes, and the presence of risk factors for intercurrent comorbidities and chronic renal disease.
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Acute kidney injury; Glomerular filtration rate; Outcome; Proteinuria; Septic shock
Mariano F.; De Biase C.; Hollo Z.; Deambrosis I.; Davit A.; Mella A.; Bergamo D.; Maffei S.; Rumbolo F.; Papaleo A.; Stella M.; Biancone L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1828668
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