Introduction: Since medication errors related to incorrect administration routes are less common than other errors, they are rarely considered when assessing patient mistakes. The present review was performed to search for papers assessing incorrect route medication errors made by adult patients with the aim of providing an overview of this phenomenon. Areas covered: PubMed, Scopus, and EMBASE were searched up to October 2019 using free text and MeSH terms, returning 7609 results. Papers were considered eligible if they considered incorrect administration route errors by adult patients in domestic settings. Eleven papers were included, primarily from National Poison Centers (NPCs) or similar institutions from USA or Europe (observation period: 1985–2014). The data showed how an incorrect route of self-administration is a concern for patient safety and should be considered when evaluating medication errors. Moreover, one of the main observations that the results highlighted was the difficulty of obtaining clear and precise data regarding self-administration. Expert opinion: NPC reports are a reliable but not exhaustive tool due to high underreporting; reports should provide additional information or insights into these issues. Additionally, improvements in drug packaging and labeling, proper plain language instruction and patient education could reduce the frequency of such errors.

Wrong administration route of medications in the domestic setting: a review of an underestimated public health topic

Gualano M. R.
First
;
Lo Moro G.;Voglino G.
;
Catozzi D.;Bert F.;Siliquini R.
Last
2021

Abstract

Introduction: Since medication errors related to incorrect administration routes are less common than other errors, they are rarely considered when assessing patient mistakes. The present review was performed to search for papers assessing incorrect route medication errors made by adult patients with the aim of providing an overview of this phenomenon. Areas covered: PubMed, Scopus, and EMBASE were searched up to October 2019 using free text and MeSH terms, returning 7609 results. Papers were considered eligible if they considered incorrect administration route errors by adult patients in domestic settings. Eleven papers were included, primarily from National Poison Centers (NPCs) or similar institutions from USA or Europe (observation period: 1985–2014). The data showed how an incorrect route of self-administration is a concern for patient safety and should be considered when evaluating medication errors. Moreover, one of the main observations that the results highlighted was the difficulty of obtaining clear and precise data regarding self-administration. Expert opinion: NPC reports are a reliable but not exhaustive tool due to high underreporting; reports should provide additional information or insights into these issues. Additionally, improvements in drug packaging and labeling, proper plain language instruction and patient education could reduce the frequency of such errors.
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Accidents; health communication; home; incorrect administration route; medication errors; self-administration error; Adult; Europe; Humans; Medication Errors; Public Health
Gualano M.R.; Lo Moro G.; Voglino G.; Catozzi D.; Bert F.; Siliquini R.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1835325
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