The environmental distribution of non-obligate orchid mycorrhizal (OM) symbionts belonging to the ‘rhizoctonia’ complex remains elusive. Some of these fungi, indeed, are undetectable in soil outside the host rhizosphere. A manipulation experiment was performed to assess the importance of neighbouring non-orchid plants and soil as possible reservoirs of OM fungi for Spiranthes spiralis, a widespread photosynthetic European terrestrial orchid species. Fungi of S. spiralis roots were identified by DNA metabarcoding before and 4 months after the removal of the surrounding vegetation and soil. Although such a treatment significantly affected fungal colonization of newly-formed orchid roots, most OM fungi were consistently associated with the host roots. Frequency patterns in differently aged roots suggest that these fungi colonize new orchid roots from either older roots or other parts of the same plant, which may thus represent an environmental source for the subsequent establishment of the OM symbiosis.

Can orchid mycorrhizal fungi be persistently harbored by the plant host?

Calevo J.
First
;
Voyron S.;Adamo M.;Alibrandi P.;Perotto S.;Girlanda M.
Last
2021

Abstract

The environmental distribution of non-obligate orchid mycorrhizal (OM) symbionts belonging to the ‘rhizoctonia’ complex remains elusive. Some of these fungi, indeed, are undetectable in soil outside the host rhizosphere. A manipulation experiment was performed to assess the importance of neighbouring non-orchid plants and soil as possible reservoirs of OM fungi for Spiranthes spiralis, a widespread photosynthetic European terrestrial orchid species. Fungi of S. spiralis roots were identified by DNA metabarcoding before and 4 months after the removal of the surrounding vegetation and soil. Although such a treatment significantly affected fungal colonization of newly-formed orchid roots, most OM fungi were consistently associated with the host roots. Frequency patterns in differently aged roots suggest that these fungi colonize new orchid roots from either older roots or other parts of the same plant, which may thus represent an environmental source for the subsequent establishment of the OM symbiosis.
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Ceratobasidiaceae; Orchidaceae; Rhizoctonia; Sebacinales; Thelephoraceae; Tulasnellaceae
Calevo J.; Voyron S.; Adamo M.; Alibrandi P.; Perotto S.; Girlanda M.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1836424
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