Background: Rare diseases (RDs) encompass many difficult-to-treat conditions with different characteristics often associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, data about transplant outcomes in adult patients are still lacking and limited to case reports/case series without differentiation between immunological/non-immunological RDs. Methods: Retrospective analysis among all adult kidney transplanted patients (KTs) with RDs (RDsKT group) performed in our high-volume transplantation center between 2005 and 2016. RDs were classified according to the Orphanet code system differentiating between immunological and non-immunological diseases, also comparing clinical outcomes and temporal trends to a control population without RDs (nRDsKT). Results: Among 1381 KTs, 350 patients (25.3%) were affected by RDs (RDsKTs). During a f/up > 5 years [median 7.9 years (4.8–11.1)], kidney function and graft/patient survival did not differ from nRDsKTs. Considering all post-transplant complications, RDsKTs (including, by definition, patients with primary glomerulopathy except on IgA nephropathy) have more recurrent and de-novo glomerulonephritis (14.6% vs. 9.6% in nRDsKTs; p = 0.05), similar rates of de-novo cancers, post-transplant diabetes, dysmetabolism, hematologic disorders, urologic/vascular problems, and lower infectious episodes than nRDsKTs (63.7% vs 72.7%; p = 0.013). Additional stratification for immunological and non-immunological RDsKTs or transplantation periods (before/after 2010) showed no differences or temporal trends between groups. Conclusions: Kidney transplant centers are deeply involved in RDs management. Despite their high-complex profile, both immunological and non-immunological RDsKTs experienced favorable patients’ and graft survival.

Clinical outcomes and temporal trends of immunological and non-immunological rare diseases in adult kidney transplant

Gallo E.;Mingozzi S.;Mella A.;Fop F.;Presta R.;Burdese M.;Boaglio E.;Giraudi R.;Leonardi G.;Lavacca A.;Gontero P.;Bosio A.;Verri A.;Dolla C.;Biancone L.
2021

Abstract

Background: Rare diseases (RDs) encompass many difficult-to-treat conditions with different characteristics often associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, data about transplant outcomes in adult patients are still lacking and limited to case reports/case series without differentiation between immunological/non-immunological RDs. Methods: Retrospective analysis among all adult kidney transplanted patients (KTs) with RDs (RDsKT group) performed in our high-volume transplantation center between 2005 and 2016. RDs were classified according to the Orphanet code system differentiating between immunological and non-immunological diseases, also comparing clinical outcomes and temporal trends to a control population without RDs (nRDsKT). Results: Among 1381 KTs, 350 patients (25.3%) were affected by RDs (RDsKTs). During a f/up > 5 years [median 7.9 years (4.8–11.1)], kidney function and graft/patient survival did not differ from nRDsKTs. Considering all post-transplant complications, RDsKTs (including, by definition, patients with primary glomerulopathy except on IgA nephropathy) have more recurrent and de-novo glomerulonephritis (14.6% vs. 9.6% in nRDsKTs; p = 0.05), similar rates of de-novo cancers, post-transplant diabetes, dysmetabolism, hematologic disorders, urologic/vascular problems, and lower infectious episodes than nRDsKTs (63.7% vs 72.7%; p = 0.013). Additional stratification for immunological and non-immunological RDsKTs or transplantation periods (before/after 2010) showed no differences or temporal trends between groups. Conclusions: Kidney transplant centers are deeply involved in RDs management. Despite their high-complex profile, both immunological and non-immunological RDsKTs experienced favorable patients’ and graft survival.
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Genetic renal diseases; Kidney transplantation; Primary glomerulonephritis; Rare diseases; Survival
Gallo E.; Mingozzi S.; Mella A.; Fop F.; Presta R.; Burdese M.; Boaglio E.; Torazza M.C.; Giraudi R.; Leonardi G.; Lavacca A.; Gontero P.; Sedigh O.; Bosio A.; Verri A.; Dolla C.; Biancone L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1839098
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