Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common pediatric malignant bone tumor. Although surgery together with neoadjuvant/adjuvant chemotherapy has improved survival for localized OSA, most patients develop recurrent/metastatic disease with a dismally poor outcome. Therapeutic options have not improved for these OSA patients in recent decades. As OSA is a rare and “orphan” tumor, with no distinct targetable driver antigens, the development of new efficient therapies is still an unmet and challenging clinical need. Appropriate animal models are therefore critical for advancement in the field. Despite the undoubted relevance of pre-clinical mouse models in cancer research, they present some intrinsic limitations that may be responsible for the low translational success of novel therapies from the pre-clinical setting to the clinic. From this context emerges the concept of comparative oncology, which has spurred the study of pet dogs as a uniquely valuable model of spontaneous OSA that develops in an immune-competent system with high biological and clinical similarities to corresponding human tumors, including in its metastatic behavior and resistance to conventional therapies. For these reasons, the translational power of studies conducted on OSA-bearing dogs has seen increasing recognition. The most recent and relevant veterinary investigations of novel combinatorial approaches, with a focus on immune-based strategies, that can most likely benefit both canine and human OSA patients have been summarized in this commentary.

Improving Osteosarcoma Treatment: Comparative Oncology in Action

Tarone, Lidia;Mareschi, Katia;Tirtei, Elisa;Giacobino, Davide;Camerino, Mariateresa;Buracco, Paolo;Morello, Emanuela;Cavallo, Federica
Co-last
;
Riccardo, Federica
2022-01-01

Abstract

Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common pediatric malignant bone tumor. Although surgery together with neoadjuvant/adjuvant chemotherapy has improved survival for localized OSA, most patients develop recurrent/metastatic disease with a dismally poor outcome. Therapeutic options have not improved for these OSA patients in recent decades. As OSA is a rare and “orphan” tumor, with no distinct targetable driver antigens, the development of new efficient therapies is still an unmet and challenging clinical need. Appropriate animal models are therefore critical for advancement in the field. Despite the undoubted relevance of pre-clinical mouse models in cancer research, they present some intrinsic limitations that may be responsible for the low translational success of novel therapies from the pre-clinical setting to the clinic. From this context emerges the concept of comparative oncology, which has spurred the study of pet dogs as a uniquely valuable model of spontaneous OSA that develops in an immune-competent system with high biological and clinical similarities to corresponding human tumors, including in its metastatic behavior and resistance to conventional therapies. For these reasons, the translational power of studies conducted on OSA-bearing dogs has seen increasing recognition. The most recent and relevant veterinary investigations of novel combinatorial approaches, with a focus on immune-based strategies, that can most likely benefit both canine and human OSA patients have been summarized in this commentary.
2022
12
12
2099
2121
CSPG4; comparative oncology; immunotherapy; osteosarcoma
Tarone, Lidia; Mareschi, Katia; Tirtei, Elisa; Giacobino, Davide; Camerino, Mariateresa; Buracco, Paolo; Morello, Emanuela; Cavallo, Federica; Riccardo, Federica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1888656
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