: Perennial plants are frequently exposed to severe and prolonged drought, and when the balance between water transport and transpirational demand is compromised trees are in danger of embolism formation. To maintain the physiological balance, plants can rely on mechanisms to quickly recover the lost xylem hydraulic capacity and reduce the prolonged impact on photosynthetic activity upon rehydration. Among factors helpful for plants to sustain acclimation and adaptation responses to drought and promote recovery, maintaining an optimal nutritional status is crucial for plant survival. This study aimed to investigate the physiological and biochemical responses under drought and recovery of Populus nigra plants grown in soil with impaired nutrient bioavailability obtained by adding calcium oxide (CaO) to the substrate. Although the CaO treatment did not affect plant growth, in well-watered conditions, treated poplars displayed an impaired inorganic ions profile in tissues. Under drought, although CaO-treated and untreated plants showed similar physiological responses, the former closed the stomata earlier. During water stress relief, the CaO-treated poplars exhibited a faster stomatal opening and a higher capacity to restore xylem hydraulic conductivity compared to not-treated plants, probably due to the higher osmolyte accumulation during drought. The content of some inorganic ions (e.g, Ca2+ and Cl-) was also higher in the xylem sap collected from stressed CaO-treated plants, thus contributing to increase the osmotic gradient necessary for the recovery. Taken together, our results suggest that CaO treatment promotes a faster and more efficient plant recovery after drought due to a modulation of ions homeostasis.

Alkaline soil primes the recovery from drought in Populus nigra plants through physiological and chemical adjustments

Secchi, Francesca
;
Bevilacqua, Ivan;Agliassa, Chiara;Maghrebi, Moez;Cavalletto, Silvia;Morabito, Cristina;Lembo, Silvia;Vigani, Gianpiero
2023-01-01

Abstract

: Perennial plants are frequently exposed to severe and prolonged drought, and when the balance between water transport and transpirational demand is compromised trees are in danger of embolism formation. To maintain the physiological balance, plants can rely on mechanisms to quickly recover the lost xylem hydraulic capacity and reduce the prolonged impact on photosynthetic activity upon rehydration. Among factors helpful for plants to sustain acclimation and adaptation responses to drought and promote recovery, maintaining an optimal nutritional status is crucial for plant survival. This study aimed to investigate the physiological and biochemical responses under drought and recovery of Populus nigra plants grown in soil with impaired nutrient bioavailability obtained by adding calcium oxide (CaO) to the substrate. Although the CaO treatment did not affect plant growth, in well-watered conditions, treated poplars displayed an impaired inorganic ions profile in tissues. Under drought, although CaO-treated and untreated plants showed similar physiological responses, the former closed the stomata earlier. During water stress relief, the CaO-treated poplars exhibited a faster stomatal opening and a higher capacity to restore xylem hydraulic conductivity compared to not-treated plants, probably due to the higher osmolyte accumulation during drought. The content of some inorganic ions (e.g, Ca2+ and Cl-) was also higher in the xylem sap collected from stressed CaO-treated plants, thus contributing to increase the osmotic gradient necessary for the recovery. Taken together, our results suggest that CaO treatment promotes a faster and more efficient plant recovery after drought due to a modulation of ions homeostasis.
2023
201
1
10
Alkaline soil; Drought; Embolism; Ion homeostasis; Osmolyte; Recovery
Secchi, Francesca; Bevilacqua, Ivan; Agliassa, Chiara; Maghrebi, Moez; Cavalletto, Silvia; Morabito, Cristina; Lembo, Silvia; Vigani, Gianpiero
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1927930
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