Hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) as pathogenic factors for the onset of HCV-related endothelial dysfunction. Sixty-five patients with various stages of HCV-related chronic liver disease were enrolled in this case series. Plasma EVs were characterized and used to stimulate human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), which were examined for cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) release. The results showed that EVs from HCV patients were mainly of endothelial and lymphocyte origin. Moreover, EVs were able to reduce cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential of HUVEC, while increasing ROS release. Those harmful effects were reduced by the pretreatment of HUVEC with the NLR family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)/AMP-activated protein kinase and protein kinase B blockers. In conclusion, in HCV patients, we could highlight a circulating pattern of EVs capable of inducing damage to the endothelium. These data represent a novel possible pathogenic mechanism underlying the reported increase of CVD occurrence in HCV infection and could be of clinical relevance also in relation to the widespread use of antiviral drugs.

Plasma Pattern of Extracellular Vesicles Isolated from Hepatitis C Virus Patients and Their Effects on Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

Smirne, Carlo;Cantaluppi, Vincenzo;Comi, Cristoforo;Tanzi, Adele;Bussolati, Benedetta;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) as pathogenic factors for the onset of HCV-related endothelial dysfunction. Sixty-five patients with various stages of HCV-related chronic liver disease were enrolled in this case series. Plasma EVs were characterized and used to stimulate human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), which were examined for cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) release. The results showed that EVs from HCV patients were mainly of endothelial and lymphocyte origin. Moreover, EVs were able to reduce cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential of HUVEC, while increasing ROS release. Those harmful effects were reduced by the pretreatment of HUVEC with the NLR family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)/AMP-activated protein kinase and protein kinase B blockers. In conclusion, in HCV patients, we could highlight a circulating pattern of EVs capable of inducing damage to the endothelium. These data represent a novel possible pathogenic mechanism underlying the reported increase of CVD occurrence in HCV infection and could be of clinical relevance also in relation to the widespread use of antiviral drugs.
2023
24
12
1
25
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC10299492/
cardiovascular disease; cell survival; endothelial dysfunction; exosomes; hepatitis C virus; hepatocellular carcinoma; liver cirrhosis; liver fibrosis; oxidative stress; vesicles
Grossini, Elena; Smirne, Carlo; Venkatesan, Sakthipriyan; Tonello, Stelvio; D'Onghia, Davide; Minisini, Rosalba; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Sainaghi, Pier Paolo; Comi, Cristoforo; Tanzi, Adele; Bussolati, Benedetta; Pirisi, Mario
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1942452
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