Although many researchers addressed the topics, no consistent data are currently available regarding the relationship between perfectionism and personality traits in anorexia nervosa (AN). The present study aimed to assess differences between high- and low-perfectionism groups of patients with AN and to identify which variables show the strongest association with perfectionism. A group of inpatients with AN (n = 193) was recruited and completed a battery of self-report questionnaires regarding eating-related and general psychopathology, perfectionism, and personality. On the basis of perfectionism scores, patients were divided into high- and low-perfectionism groups. High-perfectionist patients displayed higher eating-related and general psychopathology; higher depressive, cyclothymic, irritable and anxious temperament, and lower self-directedness, cooperativeness and self-esteem. Perfectionism was associated with the drive for thinness, cooperativeness, self-esteem and anxious temperament. On the basis of the two personality traits most strongly correlated with perfectionism (i.e., cooperativeness and anxious temperament), patients could be correctly assigned to the high- or low-perfectionism group by an algorithm. The study suggests that perfectionism in AN is related to eating psychopathology, especially of restrictive type, and personality features such as cooperativeness and anxious temperament. These findings confirm the important role of perfectionism in AN, not only concerning eating behaviour but personality as well.

Perfectionism in anorexia nervosa: Associations with clinical picture and personality traits

Longo, Paola;Bevione, Francesco;Amodeo, Laura;Martini, Matteo;Panero, Matteo;Abbate-Daga, Giovanni
2023-01-01

Abstract

Although many researchers addressed the topics, no consistent data are currently available regarding the relationship between perfectionism and personality traits in anorexia nervosa (AN). The present study aimed to assess differences between high- and low-perfectionism groups of patients with AN and to identify which variables show the strongest association with perfectionism. A group of inpatients with AN (n = 193) was recruited and completed a battery of self-report questionnaires regarding eating-related and general psychopathology, perfectionism, and personality. On the basis of perfectionism scores, patients were divided into high- and low-perfectionism groups. High-perfectionist patients displayed higher eating-related and general psychopathology; higher depressive, cyclothymic, irritable and anxious temperament, and lower self-directedness, cooperativeness and self-esteem. Perfectionism was associated with the drive for thinness, cooperativeness, self-esteem and anxious temperament. On the basis of the two personality traits most strongly correlated with perfectionism (i.e., cooperativeness and anxious temperament), patients could be correctly assigned to the high- or low-perfectionism group by an algorithm. The study suggests that perfectionism in AN is related to eating psychopathology, especially of restrictive type, and personality features such as cooperativeness and anxious temperament. These findings confirm the important role of perfectionism in AN, not only concerning eating behaviour but personality as well.
2023
1
1
12
affective temperament; anorexia nervosa; eating disorders; perfectionism; personality
Longo, Paola; Bevione, Francesco; Amodeo, Laura; Martini, Matteo; Panero, Matteo; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1945697
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