The incidence reported for carcinomas of the head and neck currently peaks between the sixth and seventh decades of life. In this retrospective study we were interested in learning whether age is a potentially significant prognostic factor for survival. We considered a set of variables in a series of 134 patients, divided into two groups; between 65 and 70 years of age, and older than 70. Stage I-II tumors were present in 44 patients, while locally advanced lesions (stages III-IV) were present in 90. Statistical analysis of survival was performed using the actuarial survival rates according to Kaplan-Meier; significance was evaluated using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed according to the Cox logistic regression model to determine the prognostic significance of any of the variables. Univariate analysis was performed on a series of variables regarding the patient, tumor and treatment. In the younger group, age appeared to be a favorable prognostic factor. Tumor size had a significant effect on disease-free survival, both globally and between the two groups (p < 0.05). Lymph node status substantially influenced the five-year survival rate (p = 0.001). Tumor invasion of the lymph nodes led to a difference between the two groups. Survival was lower in the younger than in the older group. There was a significant difference (p < 0.01) in survival between patients who had undergone surgery (75%) and those who received radiotherapy alone (33%). Multivariate analysis of these variables showed that disease stage, and treatment of lymph nodes were both significant (p = 0.0016 and p = 0.0002, respectively). Survival rates for the so-called 'young elderly' (65-70 years) are generally higher than that for those aged 70 and over. Following accurate and comprehensive assessment by the anesthesiologist and the internist, and appropriate adjustment of the patient's nutritional and metabolic status, combined radical surgery and radiotherapy can and must be performed. Minimal palliative interventions, in the belief that tumor growth is biologically less aggressive in the elderly patient, should be avoided.

Carcinoma of the larynx in the elderly: analysis of potentially significant prognostic variables.

ALBERA, Roberto;RAGONA, Riccardo;CORTESINA, Giorgio
1999

Abstract

The incidence reported for carcinomas of the head and neck currently peaks between the sixth and seventh decades of life. In this retrospective study we were interested in learning whether age is a potentially significant prognostic factor for survival. We considered a set of variables in a series of 134 patients, divided into two groups; between 65 and 70 years of age, and older than 70. Stage I-II tumors were present in 44 patients, while locally advanced lesions (stages III-IV) were present in 90. Statistical analysis of survival was performed using the actuarial survival rates according to Kaplan-Meier; significance was evaluated using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed according to the Cox logistic regression model to determine the prognostic significance of any of the variables. Univariate analysis was performed on a series of variables regarding the patient, tumor and treatment. In the younger group, age appeared to be a favorable prognostic factor. Tumor size had a significant effect on disease-free survival, both globally and between the two groups (p < 0.05). Lymph node status substantially influenced the five-year survival rate (p = 0.001). Tumor invasion of the lymph nodes led to a difference between the two groups. Survival was lower in the younger than in the older group. There was a significant difference (p < 0.01) in survival between patients who had undergone surgery (75%) and those who received radiotherapy alone (33%). Multivariate analysis of these variables showed that disease stage, and treatment of lymph nodes were both significant (p = 0.0016 and p = 0.0002, respectively). Survival rates for the so-called 'young elderly' (65-70 years) are generally higher than that for those aged 70 and over. Following accurate and comprehensive assessment by the anesthesiologist and the internist, and appropriate adjustment of the patient's nutritional and metabolic status, combined radical surgery and radiotherapy can and must be performed. Minimal palliative interventions, in the belief that tumor growth is biologically less aggressive in the elderly patient, should be avoided.
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MAGNANO M ;DE STEFANI A ;USAI A ;LERDA W ;ALBERA R ;RAGONA R ;BUSSI M ;AIROLDI M ;CORTESINA G
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/30885
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