Cachexia is a debilitating syndrome characterized by body weight loss, muscle wasting, and anemia. Muscle wasting results from an altered balance between protein synthesis and degradation rates. Reactive oxygen species are indicated as crucial players in the onset of muscle protein hypercatabolism by upregulating elements of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The present study has been aimed at evaluating comparatively the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle wasting in two different experimental models: rats rendered hyperglycemic by treatment with streptozotocin and rats bearing the Yoshida AH-130 ascites hepatoma. For this purpose, both tumor bearers and diabetic animals have been treated with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a multifunctional steroid endowed with multitargeted antioxidant properties. We show that diabetic rats and AH-130 rats share several features, hypoinsulinemia, occurrence of oxidative stress, and positive response to DHEA administration, although the extent of the effects of DHEA largely differs between diabetic animals and tumor-bearing rats. The hypercatabolism, evaluated in terms of proteasome activity and expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF1, is activated in AH-130 rats, whereas it is lacking in streptozotocin-treated rats. Moreover, we demonstrate that the role of oxidative stress can interfere with muscle wasting through different mechanisms, not necessarily involving NF-kappaB activation. In conclusion, the present results show that, although skeletal muscle wasting occurs in both diabetic rats and tumor-host rats, the underlying mechanisms are different. Moreover, despite oxidative stress being detectable in both experimental models, its contribution to muscle wasting is not comparable.

Muscle wasting in diabetic and in tumor-bearing rats: Role of oxidative stress

MASTROCOLA, Raffaella;PENNA, FABIO;BOCCUZZI, Giuseppe;BACCINO, Francesco Maria;ARAGNO, Manuela;COSTELLI, Paola
2008

Abstract

Cachexia is a debilitating syndrome characterized by body weight loss, muscle wasting, and anemia. Muscle wasting results from an altered balance between protein synthesis and degradation rates. Reactive oxygen species are indicated as crucial players in the onset of muscle protein hypercatabolism by upregulating elements of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The present study has been aimed at evaluating comparatively the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle wasting in two different experimental models: rats rendered hyperglycemic by treatment with streptozotocin and rats bearing the Yoshida AH-130 ascites hepatoma. For this purpose, both tumor bearers and diabetic animals have been treated with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a multifunctional steroid endowed with multitargeted antioxidant properties. We show that diabetic rats and AH-130 rats share several features, hypoinsulinemia, occurrence of oxidative stress, and positive response to DHEA administration, although the extent of the effects of DHEA largely differs between diabetic animals and tumor-bearing rats. The hypercatabolism, evaluated in terms of proteasome activity and expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF1, is activated in AH-130 rats, whereas it is lacking in streptozotocin-treated rats. Moreover, we demonstrate that the role of oxidative stress can interfere with muscle wasting through different mechanisms, not necessarily involving NF-kappaB activation. In conclusion, the present results show that, although skeletal muscle wasting occurs in both diabetic rats and tumor-host rats, the underlying mechanisms are different. Moreover, despite oxidative stress being detectable in both experimental models, its contribution to muscle wasting is not comparable.
FREE RADICAL BIOLOGY & MEDICINE
44
584
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MASTROCOLA R; REFFO P; PENNA F; TOMASINELLI CE; BOCCUZZI G; BACCINO FM; ARAGNO M; COSTELLI P
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/34060
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