In a previous study several strains of soil fungi were reported to remove iron in vitro from crocidolite asbestos, a process that was envisaged as a possible bioremediation route for asbestos-polluted soils. Here, we get some new insight into the chemical basis of the fiber/fungi interaction by comparing the action of the most active fungal strain Fusarium oxysporum on three kind of asbestos fibers-chrysotile, amosite, and crocidolite-and on a surface-modified crocidolite. None of the fibers examined significantly inhibited biomass production. Even the smallest fibrils were visibly removed from the supernatant following adhesion to fungal hyphae. F oxysporum, through release of chelators, extracted iron from all fibers; the higher the amount of iron at the exposed surface, the larger the amount removed, that is, crocidolite > amosite >> chrysotile. When considering the fraction of total iron extracted, however, the ranking was chrysotile > crocidolite > amosite > heated crocidolite, because of the different accessibility of the chelators to the metal ions in the crystal structure. Chrysotile was the easiest to deplete of its metal content. Iron removal fully blunted HO. radical release from crocidolite and chrysotile but only partially from amosite. The removal, in a long-term experiment, of more iron than is expected to be at the surface suggests a diffusion of ions from the bulk solid towards the surface depleted of iron by fungal activity. Thus, if the fibers could be treated with a continuous source of chelators, iron extraction would proceed up to a full inactivation of free radical release. The fungal metabolic response of F oxysporum grown in the presence of chrysotile, amosite and crocidolite revealed that new extracellular proteins are induced-including manganese-superoxide dismutase, the typical antioxidant defense-and others are repressed, upon direct contact with the fibers. The protein profile induced by heated crocidolite was different, a result suggesting a key role for the state of the fiber/hyphae interface in protein induction.

Inorganic materials and living organisms: Surface modifications and fungal responses to various asbestos forms

DAGHINO, Stefania;MARTINO, ELENA;FENOGLIO, Ivana;TOMATIS, Maura;PEROTTO, Silvia;FUBINI, Bice
2005

Abstract

In a previous study several strains of soil fungi were reported to remove iron in vitro from crocidolite asbestos, a process that was envisaged as a possible bioremediation route for asbestos-polluted soils. Here, we get some new insight into the chemical basis of the fiber/fungi interaction by comparing the action of the most active fungal strain Fusarium oxysporum on three kind of asbestos fibers-chrysotile, amosite, and crocidolite-and on a surface-modified crocidolite. None of the fibers examined significantly inhibited biomass production. Even the smallest fibrils were visibly removed from the supernatant following adhesion to fungal hyphae. F oxysporum, through release of chelators, extracted iron from all fibers; the higher the amount of iron at the exposed surface, the larger the amount removed, that is, crocidolite > amosite >> chrysotile. When considering the fraction of total iron extracted, however, the ranking was chrysotile > crocidolite > amosite > heated crocidolite, because of the different accessibility of the chelators to the metal ions in the crystal structure. Chrysotile was the easiest to deplete of its metal content. Iron removal fully blunted HO. radical release from crocidolite and chrysotile but only partially from amosite. The removal, in a long-term experiment, of more iron than is expected to be at the surface suggests a diffusion of ions from the bulk solid towards the surface depleted of iron by fungal activity. Thus, if the fibers could be treated with a continuous source of chelators, iron extraction would proceed up to a full inactivation of free radical release. The fungal metabolic response of F oxysporum grown in the presence of chrysotile, amosite and crocidolite revealed that new extracellular proteins are induced-including manganese-superoxide dismutase, the typical antioxidant defense-and others are repressed, upon direct contact with the fibers. The protein profile induced by heated crocidolite was different, a result suggesting a key role for the state of the fiber/hyphae interface in protein induction.
11(19)
5611
5618
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/chem.200500046
S. Daghino; E. Martino; I. Fenoglio; M. Tomatis; S. Perotto; B. Fubini
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/55797
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