Objective: To evaluate long-term morphological, functional, and clinical outcome in adrenal incidentalomas. Design and methods: A total of 118 patients (77 F and 47 M; age 62.3G1.0 years) with adrenal incidentalomas were evaluated at baseline and followed-up for median 3 years (range 1–10 years) by clinical, biochemical, hormonal, and morphological evaluation. Among them, six patients with diagnosis of subclinical Cushing’s syndrome (SCS) underwent surgery. Results: At entry, 86% (nZ102) of tumors were nonfunctioning (NF) and 14% (nZ16) showed SCS. Comparing NF with SCS patients, a significantly higher percentage of dyslipidemia was found in the group of SCS patients (50 vs 23%, PZ0.033). During follow-up, adrenal function remained normal in all NF patients, none of them developed subclinical or overt endocrine disease. The cumulative risk of mass enlargement was globally low (25%), but progressive up to 8 years. SCS was confirmed in all patients, and none of them shifted to overt Cushing’s syndrome. The cumulative risk of developing metabolic–cardiovascular abnormalities was globally low (22%), but progressive up to 8 years and new diseases were recorded in the group of NF patients only (three patients with dyslipidemia, four with impaired fasting glucose/impaired glucose tolerance, and three with diabetes mellitus). SCS patients who underwent surgery did not show any significant clinical improvement. Conclusions: The risk of mass enlargement, hormonal, and metabolic impairment over time is globally low. Conservative management seems to be appropriate, but further prospective studies are needed to establish the long-term outcome of such patients, especially for metabolic status, cardiovascular risk profile and their relationship with endocrine function.

Long-term morphological, hormonal and clinical follow-up in a single unit on 118 patients with adrenal incidentalomas

GIORDANO, Roberta;MARINAZZO, ELISA;BERARDELLI, RITA;PICU, ANDREEA LOREDANA;MACCARIO, Mauro;GHIGO, Ezio;ARVAT, Emanuela
2010-01-01

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate long-term morphological, functional, and clinical outcome in adrenal incidentalomas. Design and methods: A total of 118 patients (77 F and 47 M; age 62.3G1.0 years) with adrenal incidentalomas were evaluated at baseline and followed-up for median 3 years (range 1–10 years) by clinical, biochemical, hormonal, and morphological evaluation. Among them, six patients with diagnosis of subclinical Cushing’s syndrome (SCS) underwent surgery. Results: At entry, 86% (nZ102) of tumors were nonfunctioning (NF) and 14% (nZ16) showed SCS. Comparing NF with SCS patients, a significantly higher percentage of dyslipidemia was found in the group of SCS patients (50 vs 23%, PZ0.033). During follow-up, adrenal function remained normal in all NF patients, none of them developed subclinical or overt endocrine disease. The cumulative risk of mass enlargement was globally low (25%), but progressive up to 8 years. SCS was confirmed in all patients, and none of them shifted to overt Cushing’s syndrome. The cumulative risk of developing metabolic–cardiovascular abnormalities was globally low (22%), but progressive up to 8 years and new diseases were recorded in the group of NF patients only (three patients with dyslipidemia, four with impaired fasting glucose/impaired glucose tolerance, and three with diabetes mellitus). SCS patients who underwent surgery did not show any significant clinical improvement. Conclusions: The risk of mass enlargement, hormonal, and metabolic impairment over time is globally low. Conservative management seems to be appropriate, but further prospective studies are needed to establish the long-term outcome of such patients, especially for metabolic status, cardiovascular risk profile and their relationship with endocrine function.
2010
162
779
785
R. Giordano; E. Marinazzo; R. Berardelli; A. Picu; M. Maccario; E. Ghigo; E. Arvat.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/69069
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