Women who present with coronary artery disease have different characteristics, undergo different treatment, and have a different prognosis than men. The increasing use of coronary stenting has improved the outcome of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, little is known about the outcomes for men versus women after PCI, especially for those presenting with a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. Thus, we compared the baseline features, management, and long-term outlook of men versus women undergoing PCI. All consecutive patients who had undergone PCI with stents at our center from July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2004 were identified retrospectively. The primary end point was the long-term rate of major adverse cardiac events (i.e., death, infarction, and repeat revascularization). The secondary end points were the individual components of the major adverse cardiac events and stent thrombosis. A total of 833 patients were included, 210 women (25.2%) and 623 men (75.8%). The women were significantly older (70.9 vs 63 years, p <0.001) and more often had diabetes mellitus (36.2% vs 21.0%, p <0.001) and hypertension (82.3% vs 73.7%, p = 0.006). The number of drug-eluting stents and the length were significantly lower in the female patients. The incidence of major adverse cardiac events after a median follow-up of 60 months was similar for both women and men (38.8% vs 46.4%, p = 0.075), with a trend toward greater mortality rate for women (21.2% vs 15.4%, p = 0.090). All other end points occurred with similar frequencies. Only in the subgroup of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were the rates of death significantly greater for the women than for the men (20.0% vs 8.1%; p = 0.029). In conclusion, very long-term follow-up of women undergoing PCI with coronary artery stenting resulted in similar rates of cardiac event compared to those of men, but greater care should be given to women presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Also, despite their greater baseline risk profile, women were significantly less likely to have received effective treatment, the use of including drug-eluting stents.

Comparison of Mortality Rates in Women Versus Men Presenting With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

D'ASCENZO, FABRIZIO;GONELLA, ANNA;QUADRI, Giorgio;LONGO, Giada;GAITA, Fiorenzo;SHEIBAN, Imad
2010

Abstract

Women who present with coronary artery disease have different characteristics, undergo different treatment, and have a different prognosis than men. The increasing use of coronary stenting has improved the outcome of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, little is known about the outcomes for men versus women after PCI, especially for those presenting with a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. Thus, we compared the baseline features, management, and long-term outlook of men versus women undergoing PCI. All consecutive patients who had undergone PCI with stents at our center from July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2004 were identified retrospectively. The primary end point was the long-term rate of major adverse cardiac events (i.e., death, infarction, and repeat revascularization). The secondary end points were the individual components of the major adverse cardiac events and stent thrombosis. A total of 833 patients were included, 210 women (25.2%) and 623 men (75.8%). The women were significantly older (70.9 vs 63 years, p <0.001) and more often had diabetes mellitus (36.2% vs 21.0%, p <0.001) and hypertension (82.3% vs 73.7%, p = 0.006). The number of drug-eluting stents and the length were significantly lower in the female patients. The incidence of major adverse cardiac events after a median follow-up of 60 months was similar for both women and men (38.8% vs 46.4%, p = 0.075), with a trend toward greater mortality rate for women (21.2% vs 15.4%, p = 0.090). All other end points occurred with similar frequencies. Only in the subgroup of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were the rates of death significantly greater for the women than for the men (20.0% vs 8.1%; p = 0.029). In conclusion, very long-term follow-up of women undergoing PCI with coronary artery stenting resulted in similar rates of cardiac event compared to those of men, but greater care should be given to women presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Also, despite their greater baseline risk profile, women were significantly less likely to have received effective treatment, the use of including drug-eluting stents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2010.10.038
F. D'Ascenzo; A. Gonella; G. Quadri; G. Longo; G. Biondi-Zoccai; C. Moretti; P. Omedè; F. Sciuto; F. Gaita; I. Sheiban
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/80797
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