Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin, the specific carrier for sex steroids, regulates hormone bioavailable fraction and estrogen signaling system in breast cancer cells. A common single nucleotide polymorphism in the human SHBG gene results in an amino acid substitution (Asp327Asn), which introduces an additional N-glycosylation site, and is associated with reduced breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women. The frequency of this polymorphism was evaluated in a group of patients that developed breast cancer while taking hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) for menopause, an interesting model of estrogen exposure. The polymorphism frequency was significantly higher in women taking HRT that didn't develop any breast cancer than in breast cancer patients (P < 0.05). To get insight into the underlying mechanisms, we compared the ability of recombinant wild type and variant (D327N) SHBG to influence estradiol effects in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. D327N SHBG was more effective than wild type protein in inhibiting estradiol-induced cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis. This depended on the fact that D327N SHBG binding to MCF-7 cells was significantly higher than that of wild type protein. As a consequence, D327N caused a larger induction of the second messenger cAMP and a deeper inhibition of the estradiol-induced Erk A1/2 phosphorylation. Our observations, demonstrating the increased efficiency of D327N SHBG in counteracting estradiol action and a significantly higher frequency of Asp327Asn polymorphism in women not developing breast cancer after estrogen exposure, first provide evidence for the mechanism of D327N SHBG protective action.

Molecular mechanisms of the D327N SHBG protective role on breast cancer development after estrogen exposure

CATALANO, Maria Graziella;FRAIRIA, Roberto;BOCCUZZI, Giuseppe;
2009

Abstract

Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin, the specific carrier for sex steroids, regulates hormone bioavailable fraction and estrogen signaling system in breast cancer cells. A common single nucleotide polymorphism in the human SHBG gene results in an amino acid substitution (Asp327Asn), which introduces an additional N-glycosylation site, and is associated with reduced breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women. The frequency of this polymorphism was evaluated in a group of patients that developed breast cancer while taking hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) for menopause, an interesting model of estrogen exposure. The polymorphism frequency was significantly higher in women taking HRT that didn't develop any breast cancer than in breast cancer patients (P < 0.05). To get insight into the underlying mechanisms, we compared the ability of recombinant wild type and variant (D327N) SHBG to influence estradiol effects in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. D327N SHBG was more effective than wild type protein in inhibiting estradiol-induced cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis. This depended on the fact that D327N SHBG binding to MCF-7 cells was significantly higher than that of wild type protein. As a consequence, D327N caused a larger induction of the second messenger cAMP and a deeper inhibition of the estradiol-induced Erk A1/2 phosphorylation. Our observations, demonstrating the increased efficiency of D327N SHBG in counteracting estradiol action and a significantly higher frequency of Asp327Asn polymorphism in women not developing breast cancer after estrogen exposure, first provide evidence for the mechanism of D327N SHBG protective action.
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SHBG; Sex Hormone Binding Globulin; Estrogen signaling system; Breast cancer
Costantino L; Catalano MG; Frairia R; Carmazzi CM; Barbero M; Coluccia C; Donadio M; Genta F; Drogo M; Boccuzzi G; Fortunati N.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/98846
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