Abstract BackgroundChronic kidney disease (CKD) has a high prevalence in pregnancy. In a period of cost constraints, there is the need for identification of the risk pattern and for follow-up.MethodsPatients were staged according to K-DOQI guidelines. The analysis was prospective, January 2000-June 2011. Two hundred and forty-nine pregnancies were observed in 225 CKD patients; 176 singleton deliveries were recorded. The largest group encompasses stage 1 CKD patients, with normal renal function, in which 127 singleton deliveries were recorded. No hard outcomes occurred (death; dialysis); therefore, surrogate outcomes were analysed [caesarean section, prematurity, need for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)]. Stage 1 patients were compared with normal controls (267 low-risk pregnancies followed in the same setting) and with patients with CKD stages 2-4 (49 singleton deliveries); two referral patterns were also analysed (known diagnoses; new diagnoses).ResultsThe risk for adverse pregnancy rises significantly in stage 1 CKD, when compared with controls: odds ratios were caesarean section 2.73 (1.72-4.33); preterm delivery 8.50 (4.11-17.57); NICU 16.10 (4.42-58.66). The risks rise in later stages. There is a high prevalence of new CKD diagnosis (overall: 38.6%; stage 1: 43.3%); no significant outcome difference was found across the referral patterns. Hypertension and proteinuria are confirmed as independent risk factors.ConclusionsCKD is a risk factor in pregnancy; all patients should be followed within dedicated programmes from stage 1. There is need for dedicated interventions and educational programmes for maximizing the diagnostic and therapeutic potentials in early CKD stages.

Pregnancy in CKD: whom should we follow and why?

PICCOLI, Giorgina Barbara;ATTINI, ROSSELLA;PARISI, Silvia;BIOLCATI, Marilisa;FERRARESI, Martina;PAGANO, Arianna;DEAGOSTINI, MARIA CHIARA;TODROS, Tullia
2012

Abstract

Abstract BackgroundChronic kidney disease (CKD) has a high prevalence in pregnancy. In a period of cost constraints, there is the need for identification of the risk pattern and for follow-up.MethodsPatients were staged according to K-DOQI guidelines. The analysis was prospective, January 2000-June 2011. Two hundred and forty-nine pregnancies were observed in 225 CKD patients; 176 singleton deliveries were recorded. The largest group encompasses stage 1 CKD patients, with normal renal function, in which 127 singleton deliveries were recorded. No hard outcomes occurred (death; dialysis); therefore, surrogate outcomes were analysed [caesarean section, prematurity, need for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)]. Stage 1 patients were compared with normal controls (267 low-risk pregnancies followed in the same setting) and with patients with CKD stages 2-4 (49 singleton deliveries); two referral patterns were also analysed (known diagnoses; new diagnoses).ResultsThe risk for adverse pregnancy rises significantly in stage 1 CKD, when compared with controls: odds ratios were caesarean section 2.73 (1.72-4.33); preterm delivery 8.50 (4.11-17.57); NICU 16.10 (4.42-58.66). The risks rise in later stages. There is a high prevalence of new CKD diagnosis (overall: 38.6%; stage 1: 43.3%); no significant outcome difference was found across the referral patterns. Hypertension and proteinuria are confirmed as independent risk factors.ConclusionsCKD is a risk factor in pregnancy; all patients should be followed within dedicated programmes from stage 1. There is need for dedicated interventions and educational programmes for maximizing the diagnostic and therapeutic potentials in early CKD stages.
27
suppl 3
111
118
pregnancy; CKD; Preeclampsia
Piccoli GB; Fassio F; Attini R; Parisi S; Biolcati M; Ferraresi M; Pagano A; Daidola G; Deagostini MC; Gaglioti P; Todros T.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/112925
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