The assistance imparted by health care providers to the victim of a sexual violence cannot only focus on the clinical intervention appropriate for the lesions suffered by the patient for it must also take into account forensic needs. Anamnestic data represents a crucial step towards the finding of forensic evidence. Our retrospective study is based on the cases recorded in the Centro Soccorso Violenza Sessuale (SVS) of Turin and in the Laboratory of Forensic Genetics of the University of Turin. The study aims to analyze the congruence between verbal reports from abused women and the laboratory data to the end of identifying ways for enhancing the gathering of anamnestic data. We considered 960 files relative to sexual violence that reached the SVS between 2003 and 2013. Having consulted the record of findings preserved at the Civic Morgue of Turin, we selected the files (73 in total) relative to cases for which the Court had requested an assessment of personal identification on the biologic material acquired during the visit. However, only in 53 cases it was possible to retrieve the results of the forensic genetic analysis requested by the Court. The selected cases have been gathered in two different categories depending on whether the victim was able to remember or not remember the events. We then looked for the results of: - cytological analysis performed on Thin-prep to identify the presence of sperm cell; - characterization obtained by immunochromatography aimed at identifying the presence of semen - DNA quantification performed with Realtime PCR. Data indicates that in 100% of cases when the victim remembered the events and the cytological analysis had a positive outcome, the quantification yielded the presence of male DNA. The quantification turned out to be positive for male DNA also in 50% of cases in which the victim’s report was positive, but the cytological exam was negative. On the other hand, in those cases in which the victim did not remember the event, there was a total agreement between the positive cytological exam and the presence of male DNA. However, when the cytological exam was negative, we could identify male DNA only in 40% of cases. Our findings strongly suggest that forensic investigations should be carried out independently from the presence of memories of the traumatic events on the victim’s part. Moreover, they suggest that forensic investigations should also be pursued in the presence of a negative cytological exam.

Analysis of 58 cases of sexual violence bearing forensic interest. Congruence between the victim's report and the data of laboratory analyses

CANAVESE, Antonella;ROBINO, Carlo;GINO, Sarah
2016

Abstract

The assistance imparted by health care providers to the victim of a sexual violence cannot only focus on the clinical intervention appropriate for the lesions suffered by the patient for it must also take into account forensic needs. Anamnestic data represents a crucial step towards the finding of forensic evidence. Our retrospective study is based on the cases recorded in the Centro Soccorso Violenza Sessuale (SVS) of Turin and in the Laboratory of Forensic Genetics of the University of Turin. The study aims to analyze the congruence between verbal reports from abused women and the laboratory data to the end of identifying ways for enhancing the gathering of anamnestic data. We considered 960 files relative to sexual violence that reached the SVS between 2003 and 2013. Having consulted the record of findings preserved at the Civic Morgue of Turin, we selected the files (73 in total) relative to cases for which the Court had requested an assessment of personal identification on the biologic material acquired during the visit. However, only in 53 cases it was possible to retrieve the results of the forensic genetic analysis requested by the Court. The selected cases have been gathered in two different categories depending on whether the victim was able to remember or not remember the events. We then looked for the results of: - cytological analysis performed on Thin-prep to identify the presence of sperm cell; - characterization obtained by immunochromatography aimed at identifying the presence of semen - DNA quantification performed with Realtime PCR. Data indicates that in 100% of cases when the victim remembered the events and the cytological analysis had a positive outcome, the quantification yielded the presence of male DNA. The quantification turned out to be positive for male DNA also in 50% of cases in which the victim’s report was positive, but the cytological exam was negative. On the other hand, in those cases in which the victim did not remember the event, there was a total agreement between the positive cytological exam and the presence of male DNA. However, when the cytological exam was negative, we could identify male DNA only in 40% of cases. Our findings strongly suggest that forensic investigations should be carried out independently from the presence of memories of the traumatic events on the victim’s part. Moreover, they suggest that forensic investigations should also be pursued in the presence of a negative cytological exam.
IALM Itersocietal symposium P5 Medicine&Justice
Venezia
21-24 giugno 2016
Abstract book
90
90
sexual violence, anamnestic data, spermatozoa detection, forensic genetics
Albanese, Erica; Canavese, Antonella; Patarino, Beatrice; Robino, Carlo; Omedei, Monica; Castagna, Paola; Gino, Sarah
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1583454
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