Salmonella contamination in raw chicken products may be transferred on materials used for meat packaging or re-packaging, which could then potentially serve as sources of cross-contamination of surfaces or foods in the home. This study evaluated survival of Salmonella in chicken meat residues on stored food packaging materials. Samples (5×5 cm) of aluminium foil, butcher paper, cardboard, PVC overwrap film, and vacuum bags were spot-inoculated (0.5 ml; 2-3 log CFU/cm2) with a 7-strain mixture of Salmonella suspended in a non-sterile raw chicken meat/water homogenate (10% wt/wt), simulating chicken meat purge. Materials were stored aerobically in petri dishes at 4 or 25°C, and were periodically analyzed (two replicates with three samples per material each time) for survivors on tryptic soy agar and XLD agar. Initial levels (2-3 log CFU/cm2) of Salmonella increased to 4-5 log CFU/cm2 within 4 days of storage at 25°C on all tested materials, except cardboard. After 123 days at 25°C, Salmonella was recovered from all the tested materials, with counts ranging from <0.82±1.09 (cardboard) to 4.79±0.70 (butcher paper) log CFU/cm2. Counts decreased on all materials stored at 4°C and reached non-detectable levels (<-0.40 log CFU/cm2) on cardboard and PVC overwrap film by day-39 and -53, respectively. Survivors of not more than -0.32±0.19 and -0.20±0.49 log CFU/cm2 were recovered from butcher paper and vacuum bags, respectively, after 88 days at 4°C. Salmonella can survive in food residues present on packaging materials for long periods of time. Thus, cross-contamination should be considered when handling or storing soiled packaging materials.

Survival of Salmonella in dried chicken meat residues on the surface of packaging materials

P. A. Di Ciccio;
2011-01-01

Abstract

Salmonella contamination in raw chicken products may be transferred on materials used for meat packaging or re-packaging, which could then potentially serve as sources of cross-contamination of surfaces or foods in the home. This study evaluated survival of Salmonella in chicken meat residues on stored food packaging materials. Samples (5×5 cm) of aluminium foil, butcher paper, cardboard, PVC overwrap film, and vacuum bags were spot-inoculated (0.5 ml; 2-3 log CFU/cm2) with a 7-strain mixture of Salmonella suspended in a non-sterile raw chicken meat/water homogenate (10% wt/wt), simulating chicken meat purge. Materials were stored aerobically in petri dishes at 4 or 25°C, and were periodically analyzed (two replicates with three samples per material each time) for survivors on tryptic soy agar and XLD agar. Initial levels (2-3 log CFU/cm2) of Salmonella increased to 4-5 log CFU/cm2 within 4 days of storage at 25°C on all tested materials, except cardboard. After 123 days at 25°C, Salmonella was recovered from all the tested materials, with counts ranging from <0.82±1.09 (cardboard) to 4.79±0.70 (butcher paper) log CFU/cm2. Counts decreased on all materials stored at 4°C and reached non-detectable levels (<-0.40 log CFU/cm2) on cardboard and PVC overwrap film by day-39 and -53, respectively. Survivors of not more than -0.32±0.19 and -0.20±0.49 log CFU/cm2 were recovered from butcher paper and vacuum bags, respectively, after 88 days at 4°C. Salmonella can survive in food residues present on packaging materials for long periods of time. Thus, cross-contamination should be considered when handling or storing soiled packaging materials.
Proceedings 57th International Congress of Meat Science and Technology (ICoMST)
Ghent (Belgium)
7-12th August 2011
Proceedings 57th International Congress of Meat Science and Technology (ICoMST)
De Smedt S.
1
3
9789079892013
P.A. Di Ciccio; I. Geornaras; M.C. Nunnelly; E. Zanardi; A. Ianieri; J.N. Sofos
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1682021
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