BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The emerging association of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) with imprinting disorders represents a major issue in the scientific debate on infertility treatment and human procreation. We studied the prevalence of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) in children conceived through ART to define the specific associated relative risk. METHODS: Patients with BWS born in Piemonte, Italy, were identified and matched with the general demographic data and corresponding regional ART registry. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2014, live births in Piemonte were 379 872, including 7884 from ART. Thirty-eight patients with BWS were born, 7 from ART and 31 naturally conceived. BWS birth prevalence in the ART group was significantly higher than that of the naturally conceived group (1:1126 vs 1:12 254, P < .001). The absolute live birth risk in the ART group was 887.9 per 1 000 000 vs 83.3 per 1 000 000 in the naturally conceived group, providing a relative risk of 10.7 (95% confidence interval 4.7-24.2). During the 1997-2014 period, 67 patients were diagnosed with BWS out of 663 834 newborns (1:9908 live births). Nine out of the 67 BWS patients were conceived through ART (13.4%), and 8 were molecularly tested, with 4 having an imprinting center 2 loss of methylation, 2 with 11p15.5 paternal uniparental disomy, and 2 negative results. CONCLUSIONS: ART entails a 10-fold increased risk of BWS and could be implicated in the pathogenesis of genomic events besides methylation anomalies. These data highlight the need for awareness of ART-associated health risk.

Assisted Reproductive Techniques and Risk of Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome

Mussa, Alessandro
First
;
Molinatto, Cristina;Baldassarre, Giuseppina;Carli, Diana;Riccio, Andrea;Ferrero, Giovanni Battista
Last
2017

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The emerging association of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) with imprinting disorders represents a major issue in the scientific debate on infertility treatment and human procreation. We studied the prevalence of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) in children conceived through ART to define the specific associated relative risk. METHODS: Patients with BWS born in Piemonte, Italy, were identified and matched with the general demographic data and corresponding regional ART registry. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2014, live births in Piemonte were 379 872, including 7884 from ART. Thirty-eight patients with BWS were born, 7 from ART and 31 naturally conceived. BWS birth prevalence in the ART group was significantly higher than that of the naturally conceived group (1:1126 vs 1:12 254, P < .001). The absolute live birth risk in the ART group was 887.9 per 1 000 000 vs 83.3 per 1 000 000 in the naturally conceived group, providing a relative risk of 10.7 (95% confidence interval 4.7-24.2). During the 1997-2014 period, 67 patients were diagnosed with BWS out of 663 834 newborns (1:9908 live births). Nine out of the 67 BWS patients were conceived through ART (13.4%), and 8 were molecularly tested, with 4 having an imprinting center 2 loss of methylation, 2 with 11p15.5 paternal uniparental disomy, and 2 negative results. CONCLUSIONS: ART entails a 10-fold increased risk of BWS and could be implicated in the pathogenesis of genomic events besides methylation anomalies. These data highlight the need for awareness of ART-associated health risk.
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https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/140/1/e20164311.long
Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Prevalence; Reproductive Techniques, Assisted; Retrospective Studies; Risk Assessment
Mussa, Alessandro; Molinatto, Cristina; Cerrato, Flavia; Palumbo, Orazio; Carella, Massimo; Baldassarre, Giuseppina; Carli, Diana; Peris, Clementina; Riccio, Andrea; Ferrero, Giovanni Battista
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1685743
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