The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of bisphenol (BP) exposure on pregnancy and neonatal life. We have (a) determined BP (BPA and BPS) concentration levels in a group of newborns and their mothers; (b) identified factors, habits, and devices possibly responsible for BP uptake; and (c) determined the effect of BP exposure. No significant correlations were detected between maternal and neonatal BP concentration levels. In newborns, positive correlations between pacifier use and BPS total (p = 0.04) and free BPS (p = 0.03) concentrations were detected. A significant correlation was also found between oral glucose administration and concentration levels of free BPA (p < 0.05). Our study points to a central role of lifestyle, hospital procedures, and neonatal devices in inducing BP exposure, especially during the perinatal period. This is the first report of BP contamination in newborns due to widely non-alimentary products designed for newborn care, such as glucose-solution containers for BPA and pacifiers for BPS. Further studies are advocated in order to clarify both the impact of other BP forms on human health and development, as well as potential BPA exposure sources during neonatal and childhood life.

Bisphenol A and S in the Urine of Newborns: Plastic for Non-Food Use Still without Rules

Bellisario, Valeria
;
Cocchi, Enrico;Tassinari, Roberta;Squillacioti, Giulia;Musso, Tiziana;Sottemano, Stefano;Zorzi, Michael;Dalmasso, Paola;Medana, Claudio;Bono, Roberto
Last
2021

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of bisphenol (BP) exposure on pregnancy and neonatal life. We have (a) determined BP (BPA and BPS) concentration levels in a group of newborns and their mothers; (b) identified factors, habits, and devices possibly responsible for BP uptake; and (c) determined the effect of BP exposure. No significant correlations were detected between maternal and neonatal BP concentration levels. In newborns, positive correlations between pacifier use and BPS total (p = 0.04) and free BPS (p = 0.03) concentrations were detected. A significant correlation was also found between oral glucose administration and concentration levels of free BPA (p < 0.05). Our study points to a central role of lifestyle, hospital procedures, and neonatal devices in inducing BP exposure, especially during the perinatal period. This is the first report of BP contamination in newborns due to widely non-alimentary products designed for newborn care, such as glucose-solution containers for BPA and pacifiers for BPS. Further studies are advocated in order to clarify both the impact of other BP forms on human health and development, as well as potential BPA exposure sources during neonatal and childhood life.
10
188
1
12
https://www.mdpi.com/2079-7737/10/3/188
BP neonatal exposure; BP non-alimentary contamination; human and childhood health; BP regulation
Bellisario, Valeria; Cocchi, Enrico; Tassinari, Roberta; Squillacioti, Giulia; Musso, Tiziana; Sottemano, Stefano; Zorzi, Michael; Dalmasso, Paola; Coscia, Alessandra; Medana, Claudio; Bono, Roberto
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1779709
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