Background: Bundles have shown to improve patient outcomes in several settings. Surgical site infections (SSIs) following joint replacement surgery are associated with severe outcomes. We aimed to determine the effectiveness of non-pathogen specific bundled interventions in reducing SSIs after hip arthroplasty procedures. Materials and methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted according to the PRISMA statement guidelines (PROSPERO registration number CRD42020203031). PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for studies evaluating SSI prevention bundles in hip replacement surgery, excluding studies evaluating pathogen-specific bundles. Records were independently screened by two authors. The primary outcome was the SSI rate in intervention and control groups or before and after bundle implementation. Secondary outcomes of interest were bundle compliance and the number and type of bundle components. A meta-analysis was conducted using raw data, by calculating pooled relative risk (RR) SSI estimates to assess the impact of bundled interventions on SSI reduction. Results: Eleven studies were included in the qualitative review and four studies comprising over 20 000 patients were included in the quantitative synthesis. All included studies found bundles were associated with reduced SSI rates. The pooled RR estimated from the fixed-effects model was 0.76 (95% confidence interval 0.61–0.96, p 0.022) with 49.8% heterogeneity. Conclusions: Results support the effectiveness of non-pathogen specific bundled interventions in preventing SSIs following hip arthroplasty. A “core” group of evidence-based elements for bundle development were identified.

Surgical site infection prevention through bundled interventions in hip replacement surgery: A systematic review

Vicentini C.;Bordino V.;Cornio A. R.;Canta I.;Marengo N.;Zotti C. M.
2021

Abstract

Background: Bundles have shown to improve patient outcomes in several settings. Surgical site infections (SSIs) following joint replacement surgery are associated with severe outcomes. We aimed to determine the effectiveness of non-pathogen specific bundled interventions in reducing SSIs after hip arthroplasty procedures. Materials and methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted according to the PRISMA statement guidelines (PROSPERO registration number CRD42020203031). PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for studies evaluating SSI prevention bundles in hip replacement surgery, excluding studies evaluating pathogen-specific bundles. Records were independently screened by two authors. The primary outcome was the SSI rate in intervention and control groups or before and after bundle implementation. Secondary outcomes of interest were bundle compliance and the number and type of bundle components. A meta-analysis was conducted using raw data, by calculating pooled relative risk (RR) SSI estimates to assess the impact of bundled interventions on SSI reduction. Results: Eleven studies were included in the qualitative review and four studies comprising over 20 000 patients were included in the quantitative synthesis. All included studies found bundles were associated with reduced SSI rates. The pooled RR estimated from the fixed-effects model was 0.76 (95% confidence interval 0.61–0.96, p 0.022) with 49.8% heterogeneity. Conclusions: Results support the effectiveness of non-pathogen specific bundled interventions in preventing SSIs following hip arthroplasty. A “core” group of evidence-based elements for bundle development were identified.
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Bundle; Healthcare associated infections; Hip arthroplasty; Infection control; Joint replacement; Surgical site infections; Humans; Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip; Surgical Wound Infection
Vicentini C.; Bordino V.; Cornio A.R.; Canta I.; Marengo N.; Zotti C.M.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1835382
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